ebertl97@univie.ac.at

Networks of Reception – Contemporary Readers of Encomiastic Poetry

The German version of the miscellany as well as a bilingual pdf file can be found below.

Numerous works of epic poetry were written for Italian potentates in the 15th century, which followed the Homeric-Vergilian tradition by adopting literary topoi and adapting well-known structural elements such as an apparatus of gods, mythical characters or comparisons with ancient heroes. For Maximilian, four major epics comprising several books (Giovanni Stefano Emiliano/Cimbriacus, Encomiastica; Michele Nagonio, Pronosticon; Ricardo Bartolini, Austrias de bello Norico; Benedictus Chelidonius, De conventu Caesaris), as well as (relatively speaking) shorter poems in epic hexameter (Paolo Amalteo, De ludo Troiano; Adrian Wolfhard, Panegyris; Joachim Vadian, Panegyricus). In contrast to homage dramas and occasional poems, this extensive, seemingly anachronistic poetry raises the question of for whom and for what purpose this not inconsiderable effort was undertaken. If one does not want to be satisfied with the reference to the ruler heroized in the poem and wants to gain information about the readers embedded in the text, the intended audience and the empirical readership, the present texts must be seen as the result of an interaction between literary conventions and socio-economic conditions. In particular, the authors’ life situations, which are characterized by institutional (e.g. university) ties and patronage relationships, must be taken into account when searching for the audience. In the following, two examples, the Encomiastica by Giovanni Stefano Emiliano and the Austrias by Ricardo Bartolini, will therefore be used to examine how a possible readership is configured within the text, who is encountered as an audience in the paratexts accompanying the work and which readers become empirically verifiable through traces of reception.

How is the audience present, characterized and anticipated in the text, who is mentioned as a (possible) reader in paratexts, who becomes an empirically verifiable readership (through textual evidence)?

This question is based on two assumptions: First, the existence of elements that evoke an interpretation and thus expand the level of meaning of the text is taken as a given. Secondly, it is assumed that the authors of epic poetry had ideal recipients[1] in mind who would be able to interpret and appreciate the cultural codes incorporated into the text. This ideal recipient does not necessarily have to be identical with the empirically verifiable readers. Manifested through textual signs, it merely reflects the idea that the author had of his audience. For the level of the text, a differentiation between narratee, implied reader and intended reader, as found in Schmid, can therefore be helpful.[2] The implied reader refers to the idea that the author has of his or her audience and which takes shape through indexical signs in the text. The implied reader is thus fixed within the text and can be traced when analyzing the text. The intended reader is also constructed in the author’s imagination, but without being fixed within the text. It manifests itself in the paratexts accompanying a work. It is also worth mentioning the narratee, which in Schmid’s terminology is referred to as fictive adressee: This is the addressee of the narrator; according to Schmid, this should be separated from the implied reader in the same way as the author is separated from the narrator. It should be noted that such a separation does not seem appropriate for the texts discussed here. First of all, in view of the conditions under which epic poetry in Latin emerged in humanism, concepts of the author persona and Auto(r)fiktion[3] prove to be more fruitful for understanding the texts.[4] Also inherent to epic poetry is the relationship narrator – narratee, in which the author as epic narrator assumes the position of the singer before an imaginary audience that does not question fictional elements. The apostrophe of the narrator to his audience had been part of epic poetry since Homer (in excessive form in Lucan)[5] and was accordingly also adopted by humanists. Similar to the didactic “you” in didactic poetry, the narrateecan be addressed directly in order to achieve vividness. Addressing the narratee / fictive adresseecan therefore be a signal to the reader to attach relevance to the following passage for various reasons – whether due to its content or its artistic value.[6] Consequently, the narratee/fictive adresse should not be completely disregarded in the search for text-immanent readers. Furthermore, Schmid’s definition of the implied reader seems inconsistent: on the one hand, the author’s expectations of his audience are manifested in the implied reader according to the introductory definition; on the other hand, Schmid sees it as dependent on the actual real reader. Since no term has yet been found in literary studies that avoids the vagueness of the implied reader without losing its practicality, the following contribution will work with the part of Schmid’s definition that appears to be conducive to clarify the issue raised: it assumes a text-immanent reader, who is referred to as an implied reader and whose favor is to be acquired through the compositional aesthetics of the text. For the authors’ relationships to different groups of recipients, reference is made to the models tested by Schirrmeister[7] .

The Encomiastica by Quinctius Aemilianus Cimbriacus[8] is a five-book epic in which Maximilian’s election as king (1486) and his imprisonment in Bruges (1488) are depicted. The Encomiastica, which originally consisted of only one book, were expanded into the present text in 1489, presumably motivated by the second coronation of the poet Cimbriacus.[9] This second version was first printed by Aldus Manutius in Venice in 1504, 1512 by Schürer in Strasbourg.[10]

The plot of Ricardo Bartolini’s[11] (ca. 1470-1528) Austrias, comprising twelve books, was set almost twenty years later; its subject is Maximilian’s intervention in the Landshut War of Succession in 1504/05 The imperial printing privilege preceding the work is dated the first of January 1515; the first edition was printed by Schürer in Strasbourg in February 1516, with a further version comprising several corrections appearing in April of the same year.[12]

Text-immanent readers

Let us first turn to the implied reader: it is important to bear in mind that encomiastic poetry was written with the intention of finding approval and, ideally, financial patronage among the expected readership.[13] Accordingly, an ideal recipient was also assumed, who should enjoy the work presented, but would also approach it with expectations and demands.[14] For the Encomiastica and the Austrias as narrative hexametric poetry, this meant that they had to prove themselves in comparison with the ancient pretexts from Homer, Virgil, Lucan, Statius or Claudian, that have become role models. Works that adapted well-known structural elements and made them fruitful for their own narrative style were considered to be of high quality.[15] This includes syntactic, semantic or content-related allusions as well as the adoption of well-known literary topoi such as calls to the muses, armor scenes, councils of the gods or even the clever incorporation of entire scenes. The implied reader of the Encomiastica and the Austrias was thus to be convinced by the linguistic and stylistic arrangement of historical events in an epic manner. In order to successfully recognize imitation and its function, the implied reader was expected to be competent in intertextual comparative reading. Such a reader was able to combine the author’s imitation of the pretext with his own reception. The Donatus auctus, a version of Virgil’s Vita published by Servius and expanded by humanists themselves, proved to be particularly influential, presenting Virgil as the court poet of Augustus and attributing so much authority to it that it was prefixed to the printed editions of Virgil’s works, thus shaping the image of the poet and epic poetry in general from then on.[16] In interpreting the reminiscences encountered, the implied reader is not dependent on an explanation anchored in the text; the semantic, structural and content-related borrowings are accessible to him thanks to his educational horizon. This leads to a circular conclusion: an epic poem was composed in order to find favor. To a large extent, its composition included elements that required a constructive effort and specific prior knowledge. Because the implied reader, which exists in the author’s imagination and is fixed in the text, can achieve this, it is characterized by precisely those text elements that require such a construction of meaning by the reader. For studies on the configuration of the implied reader, this means that it can be understood where the level of meaning of the text is extended by cultural codes, but the interpretation of these references is left to the readers. The following examples are exemplary for the respective implied reader; a complete analysis of all the interferences of meaning encountered would exceed the given framework.

Comparisons in Frederick’s speech (Encomiastica Biiii )r

Comparisons and analogies offer an obvious way of approaching the implied reader. These are not only used to illustrate narrated or non-narrated events, but also serve the narrative in a variety of ways by structuring the text, slowing down the action, increasing the tension, pro- and analeptically pointing to events, supporting the interpretation and revealing the erudition of the authors. In particular, however, they can also be used to characterize characters.[17] We encounter such a characterization of figures using a simile in Frederick’s speech at the beginning of the second book of the Encomiastica (Biiiir ). In it, the ageing emperor addresses the assembled imperial princes and calls on them to choose a suitable successor due to his advanced age:

Sim licet ipse senex, quando vel grandior aetas Consiliis prodesse potest, si viribus uti Non liceat, Pylius sic post duo secula Nestor Profuit, iratus cum non pugnaret Achilles, Sub Phrigiis caderent Danai (…)
Even if I myself am an old man, sometimes quite advanced age can be useful with advice when it is not permitted to fall back on strength. Thus the Pylean Nestor was useful after two lifetimes, when the enraged Achilles did not fight when the Danaans fell among the Phrygians (…) Translation: Ebert  

Frederick, who wants to convince the convened council to elect a suitable successor, sees himself as the future advisor of a new ruler who will help out with his wealth of experience if necessary. At this point, the comparison with Nestor not only serves to satisfy the audience’s expectations on a formal structural level, the references also offer an appropriate adaptation of the film in terms of content. The Nestor referred to is the mythical ruler of Pylos, who in Homer’s Odyssey advised the young Telemachus in his search for his father and mediated in the dispute between Agamemnon and Achilles in the Iliad, where he is also explicitly mentioned in several places (2,337; 7,328; 9,53; 10,204) as an example of a wise advisor. The reference to Achilles’ retreat from the battle for Troy as an example of a situation in which armed force cannot promise success was also chosen with care: For in the Iliad, when he refused to fight out of anger at the Greek king Agamemnon, the fortunes of war turned against the besiegers and it seemed as if the Troians might gain the upper hand. The Greek advance in the eighth canto of the Iliad was repulsed and there was a Troian counter-offensive, at the end of which Zeus even announced a further Troian advance until the return of Achilles (Iliad 8,471-483). Although, strictly speaking, the Greeks were not forbidden to fight, they were not free to use their military strength due to divine destiny. Frederick’s Consiliis prodesse potest, si viribus uti // Non liceat thus not only remains a general proposition, but is also linked to a specific situation through the heroes used in the comparison. The stylization of Frederick as a wise advisor and the emphasis on the added value resulting from his age come to nothing without knowledge of the pretext; the speech only unfolds its full potential for recipients who are familiar with Nestor and Achilles. Furthermore, readers could also find hidden praise of Frederick in the allusion to Nestor: For while the king of Pylos in the Iliad (9.53) is unable to persuade Achilles to return to the battlefield with his speech, in the Encomiastica Frederick succeeds in convincing the princes present to elect a co-regent.

The play with the readers’ cultural competence is also made explicit by the adapted incorporation of scenes from the ancient models into the text. A striking example of this is Maximilian’s flame prodigy in the Encomiastica (Biiiiv ). After Frederick had added a prayer to his well-known speech, a flame descended from heaven onto Maximilian’s head. Those present interpreted this as a divine sign and then elected Maximilian king. The Aeneid (2,679-693) provided the textual model for this.

Encomiastica BiiiivAeneid 2,679-93
Vix ea fatus erat, coelo cum flamma sereno Arsit et in medium visa est descendere longis Tractibus, ac rutilos circum depascere crines Maximiliane tuos, qualis coelestis Iulo Lambebat crines quondam sacer ignis, et oraTalia vociferans gemitu tectum omne replebat, cum subitum dictuque oritur mirabile monstrum. namque manus inter maestorumque ora parentum ecce levis summo de vertice visus Iuli fundere lumen apex, tactuque innoxia mollis lambere flamma comas et circum tempora pasci. (…) Vix ea fatus erat senior, subitoque(…)
  He had scarcely said this when suddenly a flame was kindled in the clear sky and was seen descending with long movements and grazing your, Maximilian’s, reddish hair all around, just as the holy fire once licked the heavenly hair and face of Iulus. Translation: Ebert    Her words, her groans, her wails rang through the house—But an astounding portent intervened. With Iulus in our arms, near our sad faces, We saw a filmy, shining tongue of flame Rise from his head; it licked his baby locks And browsed around his temples harmlessly. (…) While the old man still spoke Text: Holzberg Translation: Ruden  

Aeneas, who is ready to throw himself into battle, is asked there by his wife Creusa to first protect their son Iulus, father Anchises and her, when a flame suddenly appears on Iulus’ head. The semantic allusions of the Encomiastica to its original can hardly be overlooked, and in some cases there is even a literal takeover: Vix ea fatus erat is usedin both texts to describe the speech act of the respective father – Anchises in the Aeneid, Frederick in the Encomiastica – and the way in which the flames on Maximilian/Iulus’ head approach the hair without causing injury is also described with lambere using the identical idiom and with depascere or pasci by the compound and simplex of the same verb. Furthermore, the encomiastica mirror the syntax of the Aeneid passage with the use of the indicative cum-phrase, which, as in the original, follows a preceding speech act. In addition, the downward movement of the flame is also echoed: Whereas in the Aeneid it touches Iulus’ hair summo de vertice, i.e. from the crown downwards, in the Encomiastica it descends from the sky onto Maximilian (descendere). In both cases, visa and visus also emphasize the autopsy of the narrator (in the Aeneid this is the referent Aeneas, in the Encomiastica the epic narrator). The parallelization of content, which is obvious to a literate audience, is thus reinforced here by clear signals on a semantic-syntactic level. The intention behind such a structure is clear: Maximilian is to be presented as the new Iulus, who is introduced in an extradiegetic underworld episode of the Aeneid (6,679-892) as the progenitor of the Iulians, with an equally glorious future. This variant interpretation inherent in the text remains implicit; it remains the task of the reader to perceive it, which can only succeed with sufficient knowledge of the pretexts. Cimbriacus later used a similarly striking parallelization in his recourse to fama, which, by flying around announcing Maximilian’s election as king, stirs up resentment against him (Bviir ). The model for this can also be found in the Aeneid, specifically in the spreading of the rumor of Dido and Aeneas’ love affair (4,173ff.).

Ekphrastic artifact description (Encomiastica Biv -Biii )r

Another structural element that allows conclusions to be drawn about the configuration of the text’s immanent reader can be found in the artifact ekphrasis. This term refers to the verbal description of objects produced by humans or gods. Whereas ekphrasis was previously regarded as a retarding element, more recent research has emphasized the possibility of structuring the plot (for example through intra- or extradiegetic ana- and prolepses). A special means of representation technique is often the knowledge advantage of the readers, who know how to interpret a representation, over the unsuspecting characters, who enjoy the shape of the object but cannot interpret its action correctly (such as Aeneas in the eighth book when looking at the shield given to him and the future great deeds of Rome depicted on it Aeneid 8,626-731).[18] Similar to the comparison, the artifact ekphrasis also offers the possibility of alluding to a common educational horizon and thus expanding the narrative’s level of meaning. Cimbriacus used this device at the end of the first book of the Encomiastica, where a tapestry hanging in St. Bartholomew’s Church is described (Biv -Biiir). It is first emphasized in a praeteritio that the narrator, through whose focalization the tapis is perceived, was reminded of the family history of the Habsburgs: It must accordingly be depicted on the tapis, but for reasons probably related to the staging of the author’s literary persona, it is not elaborated on at this point. This is followed by a description of a kind of celestial map depicting the movements of the stars, which are anticized by recourse to mythological terminology. The depiction of the love affairs of Andromeda and Perseus as well as Bacchus and Ariadne and Theseus and her, which is also described, finds a prominent model in Catullus’ carmen 64, where the same episode is depicted on a cover of the wedding sofa of Peleus and Thetis. Finally, the tapis description ends with a kind of world map in which references are made between the respective geographical region and the stories of ancient myths. Klecker[19] already explained the depictions encountered in her essay: the historical beginning initially refers to the shield of Aeneas with the keyword genus (Aeneid 8,628f.): genus omne futurae // stirpis ab Ascanio (“from Ascanius to the future generations”). However, it is rather Achilles’ shield that is being described, as the sun, stars and moon are cited as elements of Hephaestus’ shield from the Iliad (18,483 – 489). Overall, the ekphrasis can be understood as an imitation of Homer and corresponds to the common interpretation of the Homeric shield as an “image of the world”, which can be found in the pseudoplutarchic writing De Homero (176,1), but also in the armorum iudicium in Ovid’s Metamorphoses (Met. 13,110: clipeus vasti caelatus imagine mundi, “the shield adorned with the image of the wide world”). According to Klecker, ancient ekphrases already followed this interpretation and in turn had an effect on the Encomiastica: for example, an image of the cosmos is found both on the palace gates of Ovid’s regia Solis (Met. 2, 1 – 18) and on the fabric of Proserpina in Claudian (De raptu Proserpinae 1, 259-265). Cimbriacus’ pair of snakes (geminos sinuosis orbibus angues) in the firmament refers to the common idea of a snake between two bears or chariots at the North Pole: the deviating pair of snakes could be attributed to a misinterpretation of the epithet geminus, which he would have related to the bears, or to inspiration from Ovid, who depicted Serpentarius with two snakes in the Fasti (6,736 gemino … angue). If one now expected an indication of the large and small bear (to which minorem points), then the opposition sublimem – Styx shows that the North and South Poles were obviously in mind. The model was Virgil’s description of the earth in the Georgica (1,233-250), which Cimbriacus had adapted: cernere erat et geminos sinuosis orbibus angues, // sublimemque Arcton, condit Styx atra minorem (“The pair of serpents could be seen with intertwined circles, // the Arctos on high, the smaller one enveloped by the black Styx”). After the subsequent description of the earth and the climatic zones associated with it, the image of the cloudless Olympus is mentioned. This image oft he Olympus presenting itself as immune to changes in the weather has according to Klecker been traditional since the Odyssey (6.43-45). The river catalog beginning with the Eridanus as Phaeton’s tomb was inspired by Ovid, in whose Metamorphoses (Met. 2,241-259) the world fire caused by the falling Phaethon led to such a fire. Cimbriacus then used a formulation by Lucan to describe the slow flow of the Saône, which Caesar had already noted (De bell. Gall. 1, 12 incredibilis lenitas). This formulation emphasized the paradoxical reversal of the flow rates of the Rhone and Saône and symbolized the power of the Thessalian witches (Bellum civile 6, 475: “Rhodanumque morantem praecipitavit Arar” (“the Saône drove the hesitant Rhone forward”)). Spercheios and Inachus are depicted as a combination of river gods, possibly inspired by Ovid’s Metamorphoses (Met. 1, 579 and 583), while the sea-like staging of Lake Garda is probably based on Virgil’s Georgica (2,160: fluctibus et fremitu adsurgens, Benace, marino, “like sea roaring with raging floods”). Lake Averna is named as the traditional entrance to the underworld, so that the ekphrasis leads from heaven to the underworld. The constellation of the corona borealis is also used as a way of evoking the ekphrasis of the ceiling on the bridal bed of Thetis in Catullus’ carmen 64. The mention of the protective function of the Alps (grandi vertice montes // ut quae Pannonios Alpis flectuntur in arcus // contra barbaricos vel munimenta furores) is also a contemporary allusion to the Turkish threat. By emphasizing the giants, their prison and their attempted overthrow, the ekphrasis also offers praise of Frederick, who is compared by Cimbriacus several times to the victor of the giants, Jupiter, in accordance with conventional panegyric topic. For example, the celebrations following the ekphrasis on the occasion of the king’s election are compared to the victory banquet after the battle of the giants.

Klecker’s comments on the models for Cimbriacus’ ekphrasis make it clear that the description of the tapis did not merely serve as a structural element to epicize the text (it was still missing in the first version!): Its inherent literary quality is based on the artful incorporation of intertextual references; the artifactual ekphrasis can therefore only be fully appreciated by readers who are able to interpret these allusions and bring them together with their own prior knowledge. The tapis description also provides evidence of the vividness mentioned at the beginning, which stems from the narrator‘s direct address to the narratee: The phrases used, “illic (…) vidisses” (you could have seen there) and “illic (…) spectasses” (you could have looked at there) are topical and, in addition to profiling the narrator on the basis of his autopsy – he is able to describe what he has seen to the absent person so clearly that the impression of his own viewing is created for them – they also serve to stage the audience. Frederick III and Maximilian also appear as such in direct addresses to the personnel of the epic plot. Since the epic narrator can also address people in this form and promise them fame who belong solely to the world of his narrative (a good example of this is the address to Nisus and Euryalus, Aen. 9,446ff.), the status of these addresses to Frederick III and Maximilian is difficult to determine, but they certainly serve to model the author’s persona. The apostrophe to the Venetian envoy Antonio Boldù at the end of the epic (Dvir ) also arouses interest. Boldù, who proved himself as a mediator in the conflict between Frederick III and Matthias Corvinus[20] , does not appear as a character in the epic narrative, so the apostrophe to him can only have extradiegetic value. As he is also sung about as the protagonist of future poetry and is thus even aligned with Frederick and Maximilian in parts, it can be assumed that this is also an element for modeling the author’s persona.

Banquet and performance by the bard Enypeus (Austrias Div )v

Banquets are among the central structural elements of ancient epic poetry. They offer the opportunity to bring the protagonists together, to characterize them and to introduce new storylines. In addition to detailed descriptions of the setting, the characters and the conversation at the table, they offer the author the opportunity to place metapoetic or extradiegetic considerations. Even if no fixed sequence can be identified for banquet scenes, their structure is nevertheless very similar due to the orientation towards Virgil’s Aeneid. A typical element of such banquet scenes is therefore the appearance of a bard.[21] This is one of the so-called narrator figures in epic works, who play a mediating role between the narrator and the narrated world. They are part of the depicted world, but are also removed from it to a certain extent, as they reflect the activities of the epic narrator. The introduction of such figures gives the narrator a break and creates the impression that he is not speaking himself.[22] Such a bard also appears at the beginning of the third book of the Austrias. Enypeus appears in the course of a dinner held in Augsburg, the beginning of which, including the typical elements (description of the seating arrangements, description of the food…), marks the end of the second book. He sings about the Turks and their history, which culminated in the conquest of Constantinople. The performance ends with a call for a crusade, which Maximilian also promises. As Füssel[23] has already noted, the verse postquam exempta fames, which leads to the appearance of Enypeus, is a literal takeover from the Aeneid (1,216). In addition, Füssel also drew attention to the reminiscences of the appearance of the bard Iopas in the Aeneid, which were intended to ensure an association with Virgil’s work. Iopas appears in the Aeneid in thecourse of a banquet organized by Dido to welcome the Troians. As in the Aeneid, the singer of the Austrias also has an attractive appearance, and the sound of his instrument, which is also gilded in Bartolini’s work, is described by personat with the same expression. However, while Iopas in the Aeneid recites the orbit of the moon according to the epic narrator, Enypeus explicitly does not do so in the Austrias. However, the negation of the natural philosophical lecture is also an allusion, as canit errantem Lunam is used as a further verbatim quotation.

Austrias DivvAeneid 1,740-752
Personat aurata testudine pulcher Enypheus, Non canit errantem Lunam, non furta Tonantis, nec iam vulgatos Electrae Atlantidos ignes scilicet ut magno cretus Iove Dardanus isque aedit Eryctonium, nec Caucason unde Promethei est fabula Cyrrhaeo flammam rapientis ab axe, Parrhasiam sed enim gentem Pontumque nivalem armatosque Asiae populos Turcasque canebat horribiles bello, atque alto sic incipit ore:(…) cithara crinitus Iopas personat aurata, docuit quem maximus Atlas. hic canit errantem lunam solisque labores, unde hominum genus et pecudes, unde imber et ignes, Arcturum pluviasque Hyadas geminosque Triones, quid tantum Oceano properent se tingere soles hiberni, vel quae tardis mora noctibus obstet; ingeminant plausu Tyrii, Troesque sequuntur. nec non et vario noctem sermone trahebat infelix Dido longumque bibebat amorem, multa super Priamo rogitans, super Hectore multa; nunc quibus Aurorae venisset filius armis, nunc quales Diomedis equi, nunc quantus Achilles.    
The beautiful Enypeus resounds with the gilded lyre, he sings not of the wandering moon, not of the thunderer’s furtive love affairs, not of the already well-known fires of Electra, daughter of Atlas, as Dardanus, sprouted by the great Iupiter, also built Erichthonius, not the Caucasus where the fable of Prometheus stealing the flame from the Cirrhaean sky comes from, but the Arcadian people and the snow-covered Pontus and the armed peoples of Asia and the Turks, terrible in war, he sang about and so he begins with a sublime countenance: (…) Translation: Ebert  Great Atlas’ pupil, struck his golden lyre.He sang the wandering moon, the sun’s eclipses, Fire and rain, how men and beasts were made, The keeper of the Bear, the Twins, the Rain Stars; Why winter suns dive in the sea so quickly, What obstacle makes winter nights so slow. Repeated cheers rose, led by Tyrians. Unlucky Dido spoke of various things, Drawing the night out, deep in love already. She asked so many questions: Priam, Hector, The armor of the son of Dawn, what breed Diomedes’ horses were, how tall Achilles. Text: Holzberg Translation Ruden  

Füssel’s observation can be extended: The semantic sameness ensures the association with the Aeneid and anticipates the subject of the speech, the downfall of a city. In addition to the linguistic allusion, the Austrias also offers a structural reminiscence of the Aeneid. In the Austrias, the epic narrator lists a series of anti-themes that have already been dealt with in pre-texts before the rise of the Turks is named as Enypeus’ subject and his speech begins. In the Aeneid, the contents of Iopas’ speech are listed within five verses without being specified by the narrator, after which the epic narrator mentions Dido’s questions about well-known heroes of the Trojan war. Only her wish (Aen. 1,754) to hear about the fall of Troy, which leads to Aeneas’ account of the catastrophe he experienced, appears as direct speech. With Non canit errantem Lunam, the narrator of the Austrias not only anticipates Enypeus’ subsequent speech, but also offers an allusion to the content of the Aeneid, in which a speech on natural philosophy is just as absent as in the Austrias. To this end, both texts initially evoke alternative subjects, which merely serve as a transition to the actual relevant material. In its bridging function, the Praeteritio of the Austrias isthus a reference to the narrative structure of the Aeneid. Such literary subtlety only becomes apparent with a comprehensive knowledge of the Aeneid and only fulfills its purpose of evoking positive evaluations if an audience is expected to appreciate the artful adaptation of the original. As Füssel further stated, the reports of Aeneas (in the 2nd book of the Aeneid) and Odysseus (9th-12th book of the Odyssey), in contrast to that of Enypeus, are necessary additions which, as analepses, contribute to the understanding of the actual narrative strand. Enypeus’ report, on the other hand, serves as an excursus to an extradiegetic glorification of the protagonist’s potential future achievements. From a narratological perspective, the bard’s appearance here therefore does not fulfill a direct function for the narrative, but it does offer readers with a high level of prior literary knowledge an aid to interpreting Maximilian’s character.

The fact that the configuration of the implied reader can also reveal itself in supposed trivialities and does not necessarily have to take place exclusively via the reference to a shared educational canon is shown by the mention of a certain Marianus as a participant in the banquet, whose rhetorical skills and reputation with the emperor are emphatically emphasized. This participant, already identified in the gloss as Marianus Bartolini, can be documented as a papal nuncio to Maximilian and uncle of the author[24] , but the full name and position of the glorified man do not appear in the epic glorification (Diiir -Divr ). Only the following remark (Diiir ) serves as an indication to the reader as to which Marianus is involved:

Perusina domus (…) Haec patria est olli, nobisque et sanguine ab uno Aedimur (…)
The House of Perugia, (…) This is home to him and to us, and we are descended from the same blood (…) Translation: Ebert  

Marianus is associated with another, unnamed entity, namely the narrator. It can be assumed that the praise of Marianus served not only to commemorate him, but also to stylize the persona oft he author to at least the same extent. So that this stylization does not come to nothing and the aforementioned Marianus can be identified, an attitude of reception is assumed in which the reader interprets the epic narrator as the literary ego of the author Ricardo Bartolini. This is ensured by the reference to Perugia as the home of the epic narrator. The sequence about Marianus could also be seen as an evocation of the uncle-nephew relationship of Pliny maior and minor. Like his uncle, whose Naturalis historia shaped the scientific understanding of humanism, Pliny minor also appeared as a writer. In addition to a literary collection of letters, he wrote a praise of Emperor Trajan, known as the Panegyricus. A reference to Pliny minor by Ricardo Bartolini, who strove to stage his literary persona as a panegyric narrator of Maximilian’s glory, therefore does not seem far-fetched. In order to recognize the signal for the identification of the narrator as the author’s literary persona and subsequently the identity of the praised Marianus, a readership is required that has both the necessary familiarity with literary conventions, i.e. the necessary sensitivity for clues of this kind, as well as the knowledge of Ricardo Bartolini’s descent from Perugia. Both could be taken for granted among a networked readership of humanists.

Intended readers

If the intended reader is defined, as in Schmid, as standing outside the textual world, then the textual world here should be understood as that of the epic narrative. This (cursory) overview of the text-internal staging of the ideal recipient is therefore followed by the question of who was addressed as a potential reader outside this textual world, i.e. in the paratexts accompanying the work.

For the Encomiastica, the dedicatory letter of Johannes Camers, professor at the theological faculty in Vienna[25], to Emperor Maximilian and the Protrepticon ad libellum are two enlightening accompanying texts in this respect. Camers extols Cimbriacus as an outstanding poet (vates eximius), but at the same time emphasizes his own role in the publication of the text praising the emperor. The following statement (Aiv ) is interesting for the question of the intended reader:

Dabitur deinceps opera(…) Ut caetera ab eodem vate edita carmina, quae plurima extant, in lucem veniant. Legant interea docti omnes in hiis Encomiasticis virtutes tuas, teque parentem bonorum hominum diligant, venerentur, colant
Efforts will then be made to bring to light the other poems published by the same poet, of which there are many. In the meantime, may all scholars read about your virtues in these Encomiastica and appreciate, worship and venerate you as the father of good men. Translation: Ebert  

The docti, the humanist educated elite, are explicitly mentioned here as readers, while Maximilian himself is not mentioned as a potential reader. The literary quality of the above-mentioned vates Cimbriacus and the text written by him are only indirectly relevant to Maximilian; the emperor’s possible pleasure in reading the text is not mentioned. The added value for Maximilian arising from the text is located in the reading by others, who are to be induced to venerate the ruler under the impression of what they have read. Fittingly, it is also said that the printer Aldus should make the great deeds of Maximilian and his father accessible to the people (emitteret in manus hominum). There is undoubtedly the theoretical possibility that this contemporary assessment completely misses the intended reader created by the poet (just as the poet can configure an implied reader who has nothing to do with the empirical reader – the construction of meaning on the part of the reader is then inevitably doomed to failure). However, as the Protrepticon ad libellum, which also precedes the work, shows, this is by no means the case with Camers’ dedication: the first version of the work was already accompanied by a book address[26] , which differs only slightly from the second version published by Camers.[27] What both versions have in common is the ductus of the content: if the personified work wants to avoid the fate of being misused as an everyday object, it should look for the right supporters to ensure its longevity (Enc. Aiir ):

Si non vis calamos severiores, Si non vis domini pati asteriscos Et tantum properas foras abire, Non vis esse diutius, libelle, Et cum grammaticis statim cathedris Explosus miser in graves coquinas Ad scombros venies salariorum. Ridebunt scioli mihi papyros Et frustra nimium perire noctes, Patronum nisi habebis Hermolaon, Scitum (Iuppiter!) et bonum poetam, (…)
If you will not endure the rather severe pens, if you will not endure the critical signs of the master, and merely hurry away into the world, you will no longer exist, little book. And if you are immediately frowned upon by the learned desks as a wretched one, you will come in arduous kitchens to the mackerel of the salt fish merchants. The know-it-alls will laugh that the paper and the nights perish me all too in vain, if you will not have Hermolaos a knowledgeable (by Iupiter!) and good poet as your patron. Translation: Ebert  

Humanists who were active at court or in teaching are mentioned as patrons in both versions. Marcantonio Coccia Sabello and Giorgio Merula, who still appear in the first version, are no longer mentioned in the second version, whereas Ermolao Barbaro, Filippo Buonaccorsi (also known as Callimachus Experiens) and Giulio Pomponio Leto are mentioned in both versions. It can be assumed that Sabello and Merula simply fell victim to the cuts made to the second version of the Protrepticon. However, the fact that the names of contemporary scholars were not completely omitted in the revision of the book’s address suggests that the Protrepticon was not merely intended to be reduced to the status of a metapoetic reflection by the author, but was also to be seen as a request for mediation. Qua their humanistic educational horizon, the people addressed have the skills to decipher the cultural codes presented above; they are capable of adopting the attitude of the implied reader. At the same time, they possessed, at least in part, the ability to recommend what they had read, or rather the author of what they had read, to those in power close to them. They thus formed an interface between potentate and poet, because once again it is not the ruler himself, glorified in the work, who is addressed as the reader or patron of the text, but members of the educated elite.

Comparable examples of the request for support can be found when we leave the immediate context of the Encomiastica. In the rest of Cimbriacus’ oeuvre, we also encounter poetry that presents humanists in the circle of those in power as intended readers. We should mention carmen 24 of the Codex Fuchsmagen, where the aforementioned Antonio Boldù was promised a more extensive, better glorification of his deeds as soon as the poet’s socio-economic circumstances had improved:

(…) si tibi vacabit interdum legere hoc ineptiarum Non plus esse decem scias dierum Nec limae positum severiori; Quare mi veniam dabis, pusillum Mendae si quid erit tenebricosae. Censeri esuriens equit poeta, Qui gratis triviale carmen edens Nullis ad citharam movetur oestris
(…) if you occasionally have the time and leisure to read through this little piece of gimmickry, then you should know that it was written in no more than ten days and has not been particularly carefully polished; so you will forgive me if there are a few small, inexplicable blunders in it.  You cannot judge a hungry poet who, when he writes a banal poem without pay, is not carried away by storms of poetic enthusiasm at the lyre. Text and translation: Project Fuchsmagen University of Innsbruck: C. 24 | Codex Fuchsmagen (uibk.ac.at)  

We find similar claims in carmen 26, whose addressee was the chancellery clerk Bernhard Perger[28]. There, Cimbriacus criticizes the fact that the imperial cooks and flute players receive sufficient financial support, while he as a poet is unable to make ends meet. Carmen 24 and 26 are thus prime examples of the poet seeking patronage: in both cases, however, this request for support is not addressed directly to the emperor, but to members of a humanistically educated elite, who are supposed to act as a link between the potentate and the poet. They are considered accessible to the art created, i.e. they are believed to be able to interpret the resulting texts in the spirit of the author and at the same time they are considered to have the necessary authority to promote the poet’s career.

Cimbriacus’ metapoetic commentaries on the material circumstances of a poet and in particular the group of people he addressed are not a special case. The paratexts accompanying the Austrias also present humanists with access to power as intended readers. Bartolini’s letter to the printer Matthias Schürer (dated July 27, 1515) enclosed with the manuscript already mentions members of the educated elite as potential readers. In the mentioned letter, Schürer is asked to collect errors inherent in the work with other eruditi; such eruditi must be understood as those persons who possess eruditio, i.e. scholarly knowledge. The chosen term thus literally identifies other humanists as the intended readership. Bartolini’s request was complied with by Jacob Spiegel, an imperial chancellery clerk who was in Schürer’s circle at the time of printing. His corrections (emendationes) were added as an appendix in a second edition published in April 1516 (Cciir  – Ccvv ). A total of five such copies with Spiegel’s emendationes can befound; their production after the publication of the first edition is attested by a letter Spiegel wrote to Vadian which is also printed.[29]

In addition, however, the second dedication by Joachim Vadian (formerly self-crowned poeta laureatus, holder of the Chair of Poetics and Rhetoric in Vienna[30]) for Matthäus Lang (Archbishop of Gurk and close advisor to Maximilian[31]), which was already present in the first edition, offered clues as to the intended readership (Austrias iii -virr ). As with Camers’ dedicatory letter, it is important to bear in mind that Vadian’s was the assessment of a contemporary and not that of the poet himself. However, since Bartolini, unlike Cimbriacus, personally supervised the publication of his work and even explicitly requested the second dedication to Cardinal Lang in his instructions to Schürer[32] , these concerns can be set aside: Although Vadian’s paratext is not Bartolini’s own words, their content corresponds to his conception and was authorized by him; the configuration of the intended reader to be found therein may therefore be classified as relevant. This assessment is also supported by Bartolini’s reply to Pico della Mirandola (see below).

In his dedication to Lang, Vadian writes that Bartolini’s work came into his hands by chance and should now be published for the glory of the author and the memory of Maximilian’s glorious victory in the Landshut War of Succession. Furthermore, Vadian emphasizes both the quality of the present text and the erudition of the author, explains Bartolini’s antiquizing approach to the use of proper names and assures him that, given sufficient encouragement, the poet would also be prepared to glorify Lang, who appears as a figure in the epic, with his works in the future. From the outset, eruditio, scholarly knowledge, emerges as the central theme of the recommendation (iiir ):

in manus meas (…) Riccardi Bartholini Perusini de bello Norico, plena eruditionis poemata venissent, essetque consilium non tamen meum atque eruditorum multorum ea in lucem (…) emittere, ut meritissima gloria non privaretur autor, et rerum nuper gestarum digna memoria series aeternitatem sortiretur.
Riccardo Bartolini’s poems on the war in Noricum, full of erudite knowledge, fell into my hands, and it was my intention and that of many other educated people to publish them, so that the author would not be deprived of much deserved fame and the series of recent deeds worth remembering would be preserved for eternity. Translation: Ebert  

Vadian presents himself here as part of an educated elite that knows Bartolini’s work and appreciates it for its scholarly character. Obviously, however, this educated elite did not per se have the means to guarantee the success of the work, as Lang’s appearance as a patron is emphasized twice within a very short space of time. Following the previously cited plan to publish the work (iiir ), it says

Visum est mihi tum demum hoc ipsum recte fieri, si tui in omnis eruditos patrocinii, tanti operis, vel prima pagina ratio haberetur.
It seemed to me that this could only be done properly if your patronage, which is so valuable to all educated people, was already included on the first page. Translation: Ebert  

And a little later (iiiv ):

Uno omnium doctorum ore, uno optimorum quorumque qui te noverunt, consensu is esse iudicaris, in cuius conspectum debeant quotquot eduntur illustrium ingeniorum monumenta venire. Non tam ut illorum officio ille tibi honor (…) augeatur confirmetur quam ut scire possint dignum sit luce lectione, necne quod edunt.
With one and the same voice of all scholars, with a unanimous judgement of the best and of those who know you, you are classified as the one into whose field of vision the monuments, however many are published, of brilliant minds must come. Not so much so that your reputation may be enhanced and confirmed by the duty of those same, but more so that they may know whether what they publish is worthy of public reading. Translation: Ebert  

Vadian’s portrayal of Cardinal Lang as a literary patron and connoisseur shows him to be a decisive factor in the successful reception of the work; his judgment determines the publication of the text presented. Once again, the intended reader is not Maximilian, the protagonist of the gestarum digna memoria series to be immortalized. Instead, it is once again addressed to one of his humanistically educated collaborators. The fact that Lang was expected to read the work is indicated by the length of Vadian’s poetological remarks: These resemble an anticipated commentary and, at four of six pages, take up a large part of the dedication. Such a weighting only seems sensible if a critical reading of the text by the recipient is expected, otherwise the detailed explanations could have a tiring effect and even reveal flaws that would have remained hidden to an inattentive reader anyway. However, Lang’s reading (which, moreover, can hardly be determined empirically) would not necessarily be required to promote the text: he could base his recommendation solely on Vadian’s detailed explanations, because even as a non-reader Lang would have the necessary political influence to induce a positive reception of the work and its author by the emperor. Only his interest in the work and knowledge of its existence are relevant to its success.

The same conclusions about a potential readership are suggested by Bartolini’s correspondence with Gianfrancesco Pico della Mirandola printed in the work (viv -viiir ). Della Mirandola says that the emperor, cardinal and even Italy and Germania are in Bartolini’s debt because of the work he has written, and also praises the eruditio inherent in the work. This reference to the eruditio reveals an empirical reader in della Mirandola, who appreciates the very element in Bartolini’s epic poetry that had previously been so intensely emphasized by Vadian in order to win over the intended reader, Matthew Lang, to the work. This partial accordance of the intended reader and the empirical reader thus suggests that the theoretical possibility raised earlier that the author could completely miss the empirical audience with the construction of his intended reader seems just as unfounded for the Austrias as it did for the Encomiastica.

Haec ego, non tuae ut sententiae refragarer scripsi, sed ut alii, mea qualis esset de Diis opinio intelligerent.
I didn’t write this to contradict your opinion, but so that others can understand what my opinion of the gods is. Translation: Ebert  

Towards the end of his reply, Bartolini explains his detailed response to della Mirandola’s criticism of the use of the ancient divine apparatus by saying that other readers could recognize the design principles underlying the Austrias. Bartolini’s reply thus refers to an unidentifiable circle of recipients (viiir ):

Viewed in isolation, these alii remain contourless, but they gain shape when we look at the arguments put forward by Bartolini for the use of the divine apparatus. There, the pagan deities are defended as an allegory of human emotions; to explain the poets’ intrinsic motivation to find approval with their works, Bartolini uses a quote from Horace (Ars 333): prodesse volunt, et delectare Poetae viir (“the poets want to be useful and amuse.”). In addition, reference is made to the play with literary fiction in Homer, Hesiod and Virgil, in whose succession Bartolini implicitly places himself in this way. Examples of the allegorical function of the gods are referenced without naming or quoting specific passages; knowledge of them is assumed in order to understand the metapoetic considerations (viiv ):

Hesiodi poemata exant, si ilhinc Deorum auferes nomina, totum tollas, mutilesque ornatum necesse est. Et tamen, ut illa ita de generatione mundi, rerumque ac Deorum senserit credere, quam philosophi esset, non plane intelligo.
There are poems of Hesiod in which, if you will remove the names of the gods from them, it is necessary to take away and mutilate the whole ornament. And yet I do not then clearly recognize what he thought, as is the task of the philosopher, about the creation of the world, of things and of the gods. Translation: Ebert  

The fact that the Hesiodi poemata, in which the creation of the world, things and the gods are discussed, refers to the Theogony, initially requires only superficial knowledge. Imagining the referenced scenes without the appearance of pagan deities, on the other hand, requires precise knowledge of the passages and basically also the ability to read Greek, which could not be taken for granted even among parts of the humanist educated elite. So let us summarize: Those alii mentioned above were to be enabled to interpret his text correctly by Bartolini’s literary remarks in the letter to della Mirandola. In order to understand these remarks, it is again necessary for the reader to construct meaning. Consequently, it must be assumed that this construction of meaning necessary for understanding the explanations was entrusted to the alii cited – otherwise Bartolini’s explanations would have come to nothing. Once again, it is therefore obvious that the intended readers referred to as alii had a humanistic educational horizon, even without being mentioned by name. This interpretation is also confirmed by Bartolini’s words of greeting to della Mirandola at the beginning of the letter, in which he confesses to having become more confident about a possible publication after della Mirandola’s review (viir ). This increased confidence is based on della Mirandola’s high reputation among the educated (cum tanti sis apud eruditos et nominis et autoritatis). If a test person for the possible success of the work is thus found in della Mirandola and this test person is simultaneously staged as the leading figure of the eruditi, i.e. the educated elite, then it is only logical to regard the intended (and here also empirical) reader della Mirandola as the pars pro toto of a humanistically educated, intended readership.

This impression is reinforced by the Autoris ad posteritatem protestatio following the work, in which Bartolini asks his potential readers to be lenient with him (Bbiiiv ):

Da veniam, canimus nullis tentata Camoenis Arma prius, Cyrrhaeque ferens de vertice Musas Primus ego ingredior Germana per oppida Vates.
Grant your indulgence, I sang of weapons captured by no muses before, bringing the muses from the summit of Kirrha, I stride through the Germanic cities as the first singer. Translation: Ebert  

The request for a sympathetic reception of the work is a literary topos, and the reason given for it is relevant. Bartolini hopes for the indulgence of the potential reader due to the novelty of his material. He has performed feats of arms previously untouched by the singers and brought the muses to Germania. By emphasizing his pioneering role in the epicization of contemporary warfare, Bartolini argues on a literary-theoretical level. This strategy is only coherent if one assumes an audience that is familiar with the traditional depiction of battles, notices their absence in contemporary epic poetry and has the intertextual reading skills to make comparisons.

In the other accompanying poems, Bartolini’s literary skills are praised, and Paolo Amalteo also presents Maximilian as a possible patron of the writer, but not necessarily as a reader (Bbvv ):

Cui si quae praestas servaveris ocia Caesar, Redduntur dices tempora Vergilij
If you should preserve for him (the poet) the leisure you grant, Emperor, you will say “The times of Virgil are imitated.” Translation: Ebert  

Empirical readers

Maximilian himself can undoubtedly be credited with an interest in a Latin Gedechtnus, but they were decisively promoted by the humanists surrounding him, such as Cuspinian or Celtis.[33] For the Latin speeches of the Vienna Diet, Müller[34] was able to prove on the basis of Ricardo Bartolini’s Odeporicon[35] that it was not primarily the rulers glorified in these speeches who enjoyed them, but their humanistically educated advisors. It was they who appeared as patrons of literary production and to whom literary creators turned with requests for support or referrals to a prince.[36] The fact that they are addressed as potential readers in the paratexts, and not the emperor glorified in the epic, is therefore only partially surprising. Camers’ self-staging as the rediscoverer of a forgotten ruler’s praise and the prominent mention of his involvement in the publication of the encomiastic text also show that humanistic, educated chancery employees were interposed between the author and the ruler as a mediating authority who were well aware of this role. The emperor himself was unaware of the existence of the text praising him and was dependent on being informed of it. Although the circle of potential readers can be narrowed down on the basis of the education required to decode the references to antiquity (i.e. the configuration of the implied reader) and the names mentioned in the paratexts refer to intended readers, concrete proof of reading remains difficult: the empirically verifiable reception of the texts is basically only possible with certainty through traces of reading. And even when the reading has materialized in the form of annotations, marginalia and excerpts, it is not always possible to identify the reader (an example of this can be found in Reading Maximilian, the blog series published by the (Con)Textualizing Maximilian sub-project ). [37]

The Encomiastica proves to be a stroke of luck in this respect, as – apart from the editor Camers – a reader can be identified for whom the reading interest/focus of his reading is also recognizable: Adrian Wolfhard (1491-1545) closely follows two passages of the Encomiastica (i.e. the printed version) in his Panegyris (Vienna 1512), a (at least partially biographically structured) panegyric on Maximilian: Maximilian’s election as king and the description of the tapestry. The fact that Wolfhard praises Maximilian for having brought the muses from Italy is consistent with the reception of an Italian humanist; in addition, there is evidence of a relationship with the editor Camers, who could have taken the reception of the epic he edited as a compliment. Joachim Vadian’s introductory poem names the educated elite in Vienna as the target audience, which included the dedicatee, the Viennese mayor Martin Siebenbürger (who was perhaps also addressed as a fellow Transylvanian). The reception of the Panegyris itself also took place in the university milieu; two copies of the print annotated with word explanations (Vienna, ÖNB 21.573-B; Munich, BSB Res 4 Epist 9#Beibd. 4) indicate that it was used in the classroom. The poem in praise of Maximilian was thus written and read far away from the court; Maximilian (even if directly addressed) serves only as an object on which humanistic education can be demonstrated and practiced. The possibility of proving the reception of the Austrias is similar. A reading of the text can be assumed in the case of those humanists who wrote accompanying poems, and in the case of della Mirandola and Spiegel. In addition to his aforementioned emendationes, Spiegel also wrote a commentary on the scholia published in 1531. In addition, Joachim Frundeck’s Austrias appeared in 1540, which not only bears the same name as Bartolini’s epic, but also adopted a river catalog found there.

Conclusion: Reception without reading?

Let us therefore consider the types of reader we encountered: Within the text, we encountered an implied reader who shared the characteristics of the humanist educated elite around Maximilian. It remains questionable whether the empirically verifiable politician Maximilian had the necessary reading skills; as the already cited reception of the speeches at the Diet of Princes in 1515 shows, this is certainly not to be assumed. The paratexts to the Encomiastica and the Austrias present us with intended readers who were humanists, some of whom had access to the field of power, but at least had the educational horizon of the implied reader. If encomiastic epic poetry around Emperor Maximilian I must therefore be described as poetry by humanists for humanists: Where does this leave Maximilian, the living, real ruler? – who neither corresponds to the implied reader nor is addressed or even considered as a future reader,[38] but from whom recognition was nevertheless hoped for. The role of the emperor in the reception network can be understood by looking at the practice of poet coronations. In his research, Schirrmeister revealed the personal connections that were needed to achieve the poet’s crown.[39] Not only the literary quality of the written text, but also the poet’s relationships with the circle of people advising the emperor proved to be a decisive factor. So if the poet was dependent on building up a circle of supporters in the field of power in order to realize his career goals, it is only logical that the written text also had to pass through these intermediaries before it could enjoy public recognition. Maximilian, who was fundamentally interested in memoria in Latin as well, thus remained in the role of a non-reader. The emperor relied on the mediation of knowledge about the existence of an epic, which took place through potential readers with access to the ruler, without their reading being able to be empirically proven. The recommendation of these mediators was in turn also based on recommendations from potential readers with the skills of the implied reader and a good literary reputation (cf. the triad around Bartolini, Vadian and Lang in the case of the Austrias). In conclusion, it can therefore be stated: The reception network of encomiastic poetry on Maximilian included not only the empirical readers, who can rarely be proven anyway, but also the non-readers. Only their interaction with readers enabled the successful reception of a text in the emperor’s environment.

Quoted text editions:

Riccardo Bartolini, Ad divum Maximi=|lianum Caesarem Augustum, | Riccardi Bartholini, de bel|lo Norico Austriados | Libri duodecim. Strasbourg: Matthias Schürer, 1516 (VD 16 B 562; 38.E.17)

Aelius Quintius Aemilianus Cimbriacus, Encomiastica Ad Divos Caess. Foedericum Imperatorem Et Maximilanum Regem Ro., Argentorati: M. Schürer 1512.

Vergilius Maro, Publius, Niklas Holzberg, and Markus Schauer. Aeneis : Lateinisch-Deutsch. Berlin Boston: De Gruyter, 2015.

Ruden, Sarah, Susanna Morton Braund, and Emma Hilliard. The Aeneid. Revised and expanded edition. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2021.

Codex Fuchsmagen: Poems | Codex Fuchsmagen (uibk.ac.at)

Cited secondary literature:

Abbondanza, Roberto, ‘Marianus Bartolini’, ed. by Mario Caravale, Dizionario Biografico Degli Italiani (Ist. della Enciclopedia Italiana, 1964)

Bettenworth, Anja, ‘Banquet Scenes in Ancient Epic’, in Structures of Epic Poetry, ed. by Christiane Reitz and Simone Finkmann (De Gruyter, 2019), 2.2, 55–88

Bitto, Gregor, and Maria Gauly Bardo, eds., Auf Der Suche Nach Autofiktion in Der Antiken Literatur, Philologus. Zeitschrift Für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption, 16 (De Gruyter)

Block, Elizabeth, ‘The Narrator Speaks: Apostrophe in Homer and Vergil’, Transactions of the American Philological Association, 112, 1982, pp. 7–22

D’Alessandro Behr, Francesca, ‘The Narrator’s Voice: A Narratogical Reappraisal of Apostrophe in Virgil’s Aeneid’, Arethusa, 38 (2) (2005), pp. 189–221

Dienbauer, Lorenz, Arbeitskreis f. Kirchl. Zeit- u. Wiener Diözesangeschichte : Johannes Camers, Der Theologe Und Humanist Im Ordenskleid ; Beiträge Zur Erforschung d. Gegenreformation u. Des Humanismus in Wien, Miscellanea / Wiener Katholische Akademie, Arbeitskreis Für Kirchliche Zeit- Und Wiener Diözesangeschichte, 7 (1976)

Füssel, Stephan, Riccardus Bartholinus Perusinus. Humanistische Panegyrik am Hofe Kaiser Maximilians I., Saecula spiritalia (1987), xvi

Gärtner, Ursula, and Karen Blaschka, ‘Similes and Comparisons in the Epic Tradition’, in Structures of Epic Poetry, ed. by Christiane Reitz and Simone Finkmann (De Gruyter, 2019), i, 727–72

Grössing, Helmuth. “Perger, Bernhard” In Verfasser-Datenbank. Berlin, New York: De Gruyter, 2012. https://www-degruyter-com.uaccess.univie.ac.at/database/VDBO/entry/vdbo.killy.4940/html.

Gwynne, Paul, ‘Epic’, in A Guide to Neo-Latin Literature, ed. by Victoria Moul (Cambridge University Press, 2017), pp. 200–220

Harrison, Stephen, ‘Artefact Ekphrasis and Narrative in Epic Poetry from Homer to Silius’, in Structures o Epic Poetry, ed. by Christiane Reitz and Simone Finkmann (De Gruyter, 2019), i, 773–806

Hofmann, Heinz, ‘Von Africa Über Bethlehem Nach Amerika. Das Epos in Der Neulateinischen Literatur.’, in Von Göttern Und Menschen Erzählen. Formkonstanzen Und Funktionswandel Vormoderner Epik, ed. by Jörg Rüpke, Potsdamer Altertumswissenschaftliche Beiträge, 4 (Steiner, 2001), pp. 130–82

Klecker, Elisabeth, ‘Lateinische Epik für Maximilian’, in Kaiser Maximilian I. Ein großer Habsburger., ed. by Katharina Kaska (Residenz Verlag, 2019), pp. 84–93

———, ‘Tapisserien Kaiser Maximilians. Zu Ekphrasen in Der Neulateinischen Habsburg-Panegyrik’, in Die Poetische Ekphrasis von Kunstwerken. Eine Literarische Tradition Der Großdichtung in Antike, Mittelalter Und Früher Neuzeit, ed. by Christine Ratkowitsch, Phil.-Hist. Klasse, Sitzungsberichte, 735 (2006), pp. 181–202

Moschella, Maurizio, ‘Giovanni Stefano Emiliano’, ed. by Mario Caravale, Dizionario Biografico Degli Italiani (Ist. della Enciclopedia Italiana, 1993), 613–15

Müller, Jan-Dirk, Gedechtnus. Literatur Und Hofgesellschaft Um Maximilian I., Forschungen Zur Geschichte Der Älteren Deutschen Literatur, 2 (1982)

———, ‘Imperiale Hofkultur im Blick der Gelehrten. Riccardo Bartolinis Hodoeporicon vom Wiener Fürstentag (1515)’, in Maximilians Welt. Kaiser Maximilian I. im Spannungsfeld zwischen Innovation und Tradition., Berliner Mittelalter- und Frühneuzeitforschung (2018), xxii, 19–40

Pillinini, Giovanni, ‘Antonio Boldù’, ed. by Mario Caravale, Dizionario Biografico Degli Italiani (Ist. della Enciclopedia Italiana, 1969)

Schaffenrath, Florian, ‘Das erste Großepos über Kaiser Maximilian I. Ein Vergleich der beiden Fassungen der „Encomiastica“ des Helius Quinctius Cimbriacus’, Bibliothèque d’Humanisme et Renaissance, 81 (2019), pp. 103–40

Schirrmeister, Albert, Triumph des Dichters. Gekrönte Intellektuelle im 16. Jahrhundert., Frühneuzeitstudien, Neue Folge (Böhlau Verlag, 2003), iv

Schirrmeister, Albert. “Vadian, Joachim” In Verfasser-Datenbank. Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2013. https://www-degruyter-com.uaccess.univie.ac.at/database/VDBO/entry/vdbo.vlhum.0207/html

Schmid, Wolf, ‘Implied Reader’, in Handbook of Narratology. 2nd Edition, Fully Revised and Expanded, ed. by Peter Hühn, Jan Christoph Meister, John Pier, and Wolf Schmid (De Gruyter, 2014), i, 301–8

Stok, Fabio, ‘Virgil in the Renaissance Court’, in Virgil and Renaissance Culture, ed. by Marco Sgarbi and L. B. T. Houghton, Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 510 (Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2018), pp. 31–47

Wagner-Engelhaaf, Martina, ‘Was Ist Auto(r)Fiktion?’, in Auto(r)Fiktion: Literarische Verfahren Der Selbstkonstruktion, ed. by Wagner-Engelhaaf (Aisthesis-Verl., 2013), pp. 7–22

Walter, Anke, ‘Erzählen und Gesang im flavischen Epos’, in Erzählen und Gesang im flavischen Epos (De Gruyter, 2014), doi:10.1515/9783110336580

Worstbrock, Franz Josef. „Bartholinus, Riccardus“ In Verfasser-Datenbank. Berlin, New York: De Gruyter, 2012. https://www-degruyter com.uaccess.univie.ac.at/database/VDBO/entry/vdbo.vlhum.0012/html


[1] The question of the extent to which the authors of Latin epic poetry also had women in mind as readers is a research desideratum. Based on the intended readers mentioned by name and the empirically proven readership, which consisted exclusively of men, the question of a potential “ideal female recipient” will be omitted here.

[2] Wolf Schmid, ‘Implied Reader’, in Handbook of Narratology. 2nd Edition, Fully Revised and Expanded, ed. by Peter Hühn and others (De Gruyter, 2014), i, 301-8.

[3] Martina Wagner-Engelhaaf, ‘Was Ist Auto(r)Fiktion?’, in Auto(r)Fiktion: Literarische Verfahren Der Selbstkonstruktion, ed. by Wagner-Engelhaaf (Aisthesis-Verl., 2013), pp. 7-22; Auf Der Suche Nach Autofiktion in Der Antiken Literatur, ed. by Gregor Bitto and Maria Gauly Bardo, Philologus. Zeitschrift Für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption, 16 (De Gruyter).

[4] It would go beyond the given scope to go into detail here, but it should be noted that both text-internal references and text-external evidence speak in favor of interpreting the narrator as the author’s autofiction.

[5] Elizabeth Block, ‘The Narrator Speaks: Apostrophe in Homer and Vergil’, Transactions of the American Philological Association, 112, 1982, pp. 7-22; Francesca D’Alessandro Behr, ‘The Narrator’s Voice: A Narratogical Reappraisal of Apostrophe in Virgil’s Aeneid’, Arethusa, 38 (2) (2005), pp. 189-221.

[6] Block, pp. 9-10.

[7] Albert Schirrmeister, Triumph of the Poet. Gekrönte Intellektuelle im 16. Jahrhundert, Frühneuzeitstudien, Neue Folge (Böhlau Verlag, 2003), iv.

[8] Also known as Giovanni Stefano Emiliano, for his biography see: Maurizio Moschella, ‘Giovanni Stefano Emiliano’, ed. by Mario Caravale, Dizionario Biografico Degli Italiani (Ist. della Enciclopedia Italiana, 1993), 613-15. Retrieved online at: https://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/emiliano-giovanni-stefano-detto-il-cimbriaco_(Dizionario-Biografico)/ (March 29, 2024)

[9] Elisabeth Klecker, ‘Lateinische Epik für Maximilian’, in Kaiser Maximilian I. Ein großer Habsburger, ed. by Katharina Kaska (Residenz Verlag, 2019), pp. 84-93 (pp. 85-87).

[10] Florian Schaffenrath, ‘Das erste Großepos über Kaiser Maximilian I. Ein Vergleich der beiden Fassungen der “Encomiastica” des Helius Quinctius Cimbriacus’, Bibliothèque d’Humanisme et Renaissance, 81 (2019), pp. 103-40 (p. 106).

[11] Worstbrock, Franz Josef. “Bartholinus, Riccardus” In Verfasser-Datenbank. Berlin, New York: De Gruyter, 2012. https://www-degruyter-com.uaccess.univie.ac.at/database/VDBO/entry/vdbo.vlhum.0012/html

[12] Stephan Füssel, Riccardus Bartholinus Perusinus. Humanist Panegyric at the Court of Emperor Maximilian I, Saecula spiritalia (1987), xvi, p. 144.

[13] Schirrmeister, iv, pp. 221-28.

[14] Panegyric that does not please defeats its purpose. The possibility that the present texts were intended to provoke controversy rather than applause can be set aside due to the panegyric character of the texts (evident in internal textual evidence, but also in paratexts and validated by their context of origin). The hope of a positive reception must therefore be assumed for the composition of the Encomiastica and the Austrias.

[15] Heinz Hofmann, ‘Von Africa Über Bethlehem Nach Amerika. Das Epos in Der Neulateinischen Literatur.’, in Von Göttern Und Menschen Erzählen. Formkonstanzen Und Funktionswandel Vormoderner Epik, ed. by Jörg Rüpke, Potsdamer Altertumswissenschaftliche Beiträge, 4 (Steiner, 2001), pp. 130-82; Paul Gwynne, ‘Epic’, in A Guide to Neo-Latin Literature, ed. by Victoria Moul (Cambridge University Press, 2017), pp. 200-220.

[16] Fabio Stok, ‘Virgil in the Renaissance Court’, in Virgil and Renaissance Culture, ed. by Marco Sgarbi and L. B. T. Houghton, Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 510 (Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2018), pp. 31-47.

[17] Ursula Gärtner and Karen Blaschka, ‘Similes and Comparisons in the Epic Tradition’, in Structures of Epic Poetry, ed. by Christiane Reitz and Simone Finkmann (De Gruyter, 2019), i, 727-72 (p. 727).

[18] Stephen Harrison, ‘Artefact Ekphrasis and Narrative in Epic Poetry from Homer to  Silius’, in Structures o Epic Poetry, ed. by Christiane Reitz and Simone Finkmann (De Gruyter, 2019), i, 773-806 (p. 773).

[19] Elisabeth Klecker, ‘Tapisserien Kaiser Maximilians. Zu Ekphrasen in Der Neulateinischen Habsburg-Panegyrik’, in Die Poetische Ekphrasis von Kunstwerken. Eine Literarische Tradition Der Großdichtung in Antike, Mittelalter Und Früher Neuzeit, ed. by Christine Ratkowitsch, Phil.-Hist. Klasse, Sitzungsberichte, 735 (2006), pp. 181-202 (pp. 183-86).

[20] Giovanni Pillinini, ‘Antonio Boldù’, ed. by Mario Caravale, Dizionario Biografico Degli Italiani (Ist. della Enciclopedia Italiana, 1969). Retrieved online at: https://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/antonio-boldu_(Dizionario-Biografico)/ (March 29, 2024)

[21] Anja Bettenworth, ‘Banquet Scenes in Ancient Epic’, in Structures of Epic Poetry, ed. by Christiane Reitz and Simone Finkmann (De Gruyter, 2019), 2.2, 55-88.

[22] Anke Walter, ‘Erzählen und Gesang im flavischen Epos’, in Erzählen und Gesang im flavischen Epos (De Gruyter, 2014), pp. 6-8, doi:10.1515/9783110336580.

[23] Füssel, xvi, p. 174.

[24] Roberto Abbondanza, ‘Marianus Bartolini’, ed. by Mario Caravale, Dizionario Biografico Degli Italiani (Ist. della Enciclopedia Italiana, 1964). Retrieved online at: https://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/mariano-bartolini_(Dizionario-Biografico)/ (March 30, 2024)

[25] Lorenz Dienbauer, Arbeitskreis f. Kirchl. Zeit- u. Wiener Diözesangeschichte : Johannes Camers, Der Theologe Und Humanist Im Ordenskleid ; Beiträge Zur Erforschung d. Gegenreformation u. Des Humanismus in Wien, Miscellanea / Wiener Katholische Akademie, Arbeitskreis Für Kirchliche Zeit- Und Wiener Diözesangeschichte, 7 (1976).

[26] This was translated and annotated by researchers at the University of Innsbruck in the course of preparing the Codex Fuchsmagen: https://fuchsmagen.wisski.uibk.ac.at/wisski/navigate/94125/view

[27] Among other things, the person attacked in the final verse has been changed: while in the first version an unidentified Urius can no longer turn up his nose after the success of the Encomiastica and grimacers and apprentices of fish sellers can be laughed at, Urius is missing in the second version and the successful work mocks the silliness of a Suilla. Whether this is aimed at a specific person or whether Suilla is to be understood as a cultural practice (pork sellers?) is not clear to me at the moment.

[28] Grössing, Helmuth. “Perger, Bernhard” In Verfasser-Datenbank. Berlin, New York: De Gruyter, 2012. https://www-degruyter-com.uaccess.univie.ac.at/database/VDBO/entry/vdbo.killy.4940/html

[29] Füssel, xvi, p. 194.

[30]Schirrmeister, Albert. “Vadian, Joachim” In Verfasser-Datenbank. Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2013. https://www-degruyter-com.uaccess.univie.ac.at/database/VDBO/entry/vdbo.vlhum.0207/html

[31] Jan-Dirk Müller, Gedechtnus. Literatur Und Hofgesellschaft Um Maximilian I., Forschungen Zur Geschichte Der Älteren Deutschen Literatur, 2 (1982), pp. 35–37.

[32] Füssel, xvi, p. 150.

[33] Jan-Dirk Müller, Gedechtnus. , Forschungen Zur Geschichte Der Älteren Deutschen Literatur, 2 (1982), pp. 74-79.

[34] Jan-Dirk Müller, ‘Imperiale Hofkultur im Blick der Gelehrten. Riccardo Bartolini’s Hodoeporicon from the Vienna Diet of Princes (1515)’, in Maximilian’s World. Kaiser Maximilian I. im Spannungsfeld zwischen Innovation und Tradition, Berliner Mittelalter- und Frühneuzeitforschung (2018), xxii, 19-40.

[35] This is a travelogue in the form of a diary, the content of which describes the journey of Cardinal Lang, in whose entourage Bartolini was, from Augsburg to the Diet of Princes in Vienna in 1515.

[36] Schirrmeister, iv, pp. 38-47.

[37] Reading Maximilian – (Con)Textualising Maximilian. (univie.ac.at)

[38] Nagonius  comes closest in his dedicatory letter to Maximilian: ut cum ocium nactus fueris nostro hoc labore frequentius fruaris (“that you, if you find leisure, can enjoy this work of mine more often”). However, this probably shows just how distant he actually is from Maximilian’s circle, as he cannot address an intermediary from the circle of Maximilian’s humanistically educated councillors.

[39] Schirrmeister, iv, pp. 195-212.

Rezeptionsnetzwerke – Zeitgenössische Leser enkomiastischer Dichtung

Für italienische Potentaten entstanden im 15. Jh. zahlreiche Werke epischer Dichtung, die sich durch die Übernahme literarischer Topoi und die Adaption bekannter Strukturelemente wie etwa eines Götterapparats, mythischen Personals oder Vergleichen mit antiken Heroen in die homerisch-vergilische Tradition stellten. Für Maximilian können (nimmt man den Sonderfall des Magnanimus als Auftragsarbeit aus) vier mehrere Bücher umfassende Großepen (Giovanni Stefano Emiliano/Cimbriacus, Encomiastica; Michele Nagonio, Pronosticon; Ricardo Bartolini, Austrias de bello Norico; Benedictus Chelidonius, De conventu Caesaris) genannt werden, dazu (relativ gesehen) kürzere Dichtungen im epischen Hexameter (Paolo Amalteo, De ludo Troiano; Adrian Wolfhard, Panegyris; Joachim Vadian, Panegyricus). Im Gegensatz zu Huldigungsdramen und Gelegenheitsgedichten drängt sich bei dieser umfangreichen, anachronistisch erscheinenden Dichtung die Frage auf, für wen und mit welchen Zielen die nicht unerhebliche Mühe unternommen wurde. Will man sich dabei nicht mit dem Hinweis auf den im Gedicht heroisierten Herrscher zufriedengeben und Aufschlüsse über angesprochene, beabsichtigte und empirische Lesende gewinnen, gilt es die vorliegenden Texte als Ergebnis einer Wechselwirkung von literarischen Konventionen und sozioökonomischen Konditionen zu betrachten. So sind insbesondere bei der Suche nach dem Publikum die von institutionellen (etwa universitären) Bindungen und Patronageverhältnissen geprägten Lebenssituationen der Verfasser zu berücksichtigen. Fortfolgend soll daher anhand zweier Beispiele, den Encomiastica des Giovanni Stefano Emiliano und der Austrias des Ricardo Bartolini, untersucht werden, wie eine mögliche Leserschaft textintern konfiguriert wird, wer in den das Werk begleitenden Paratexten als Publikum begegnet und welche Lesenden durch Rezeptionsspuren empirisch greifbar werden.

Wie ist das Publikum im Text präsent, charakterisiert und antizipiert, wer wird in Paratexten als (möglicher) Leser genannt, wer wird (durch textexterne Belege) zur empirisch greifbaren Leserschaft?

Dieser Fragestellung werden zwei Annahmen zugrunde gelegt: Zunächst wird die Existenz von Elementen, die eine Interpretation evozieren und so die Sinnebene des Textes erweitern, als gegeben erachtet. Ferner wird angenommen, dass die Verfasser epischer Dichtung ideale Rezipienten[1] vor Augen hatten, die diese in den Text eingearbeitete kulturelle Codes deuten können und zu schätzen wissen würden. Dieser ideale Rezipient muss dabei nicht zwangsläufig ident mit den empirisch nachweisbaren Lesern sein. Manifestiert durch textuelle Zeichen spiegelt er lediglich die Vorstellung, die der Verfasser von seinem Publikum hatte, wider. Für die Ebene des Textes kann daher eine Differenzierung von narratee, implied reader und intended reader hilfreich sein, wie sie sich bei Schmid findet.[2] Der implied reader bezeichnet dabei die Vorstellung, die der Autor/ die Autorin von seinem/ihrem Publikum hat und die durch indexikalische Zeichen im Text an Gestalt gewinnt. Der implied reader ist somit textintern fixiert und kann bei einer Analyse des Texts nachvollzogen werden. Auch der intended reader wird in der Vorstellung des Verfassers/der Verfasserin konstruiert, ohne allerdings textintern fixiert zu werden. Er manifestiert sich in den ein Werk begleitenden Paratexten. Zu erwähnen gilt es ferner den narratee, der in Schmids Terminologie als fictive adressee bezeichnet wird: Dabei handelt es sich um den Adressaten des Erzählers, dieser sei nach Schmid ebenso vom implied reader zu trennen wie der Autor vom Erzähler. Dazu gilt es anzumerken, dass eine solche Trennung für die hier behandelten Texte nicht zielführend scheint. Zunächst erweisen sich mit Blick auf die Voraussetzungen, unter denen im Humanismus epische Dichtung in lateinischer Sprache entstand, Konzepte der Autorpersona und Auto(r)fiktion[3] zum Erschließen der Texte ergiebiger[4]. Der Epik inhärent ist ferner die Beziehung narrator – narratee bei der der Verfasser als epischer Erzähler die Position des Sängers vor einem imaginären Publikum einnimmt, das fiktionale Elemente nicht hinterfragt. Die Apostrophe des Erzählers an sein Publikum war dabei seit Homer (in exzessiver Form bei Lucan) Teil der epischen Dichtung[5] und wurde dementsprechend auch von Humanisten übernommen. Ähnlich dem didaktischen „Du“ in der Lehrdichtung kann der narratee zur Erzielung von Anschaulichkeit direkt angesprochen werden. Die Ansprache an den narratee / fictive adressee kann demnach ein Signal an die Lesenden sein, der folgenden Stelle aus diversen Gründen – sei es aufgrund ihres Inhalts, sei es aufgrund ihres künstlerischen Werts – Relevanz beizumessen[6]. Konsequenterweise darf auch der narratee/fictive adresse bei der Suche nach textimmanenten Lesern nicht völlig außer Acht gelassen werden. Schmid scheint in seiner Definition des implied reader darüber hinaus inkonsequent: Einerseits manifestieren sich in diesem gemäß der einleitenden Definition die Erwartungen des Verfassers an sein Publikum, andererseits sieht Schmid ihn in Abhängigkeit vom tatsächlichen realen Leser. Da in der Literaturwissenschaft bisher kein Terminus technicus gefunden wurde, der die Unschärfen des implied reader vermeidet, ohne an Praktikabilität zu verlieren, wird im Folgenden mit dem Teil von Schmids Definition gearbeitet, der zur Klärung der aufgeworfenen Fragestellung zuträglich scheint: Es wird von einem textimmanenten Leser ausgegangen, der als implied reader bezeichnet wird und dessen Gunst durch die kompositionelle Ästhetik des Textes erworben werden soll. Für die Beziehungen der Verfasser zu unterschiedlichen Rezipientengruppen wird auf die von Schirrmeister[7] erprobten Modelle verwiesen.

Bei den Encomiastica des Quinctius Aemilianus Cimbriacus[8] handelt es sich um ein fünf Bücher umfassendes Epos, in dem Maximilians Wahl zum König (1486) und seine Gefangenschaft in Brügge (1488) dargestellt werden. Die in ihrer ursprünglichen Fassung nur aus einem Buch bestehenden Encomiastica wurden, vermutlich motiviert durch die zweite Dichterkrönung des Cimbriacus, 1489 zum vorliegenden Text erweitert[9]. Gedruckt wurde diese zweite Version erstmals 1504 bei Aldus Manutius in Venedig, 1512 dann erneut bei Schürer in Straßburg.[10] Beinahe zwanzig Jahre später wurde die Handlung der zwölf Bücher umfassenden Austrias Ricardo Bartolinis[11] (ca. 1470–1528) angesiedelt, ihr Gegenstand ist Maximilians Eingreifen im Landshuter Erbfolgekrieg 1504/05. Das dem Werk vorangestellte kaiserliche Druckprivileg datiert auf den ersten Jänner 1515, die Erstauflage wurde im Februar1516 bei Schürer in Straßburg gedruckt, eine weitere, einige Korrekturen umfassende Version erschien im April desselben Jahres.[12]

Textimmanente Leser

Widmen wir uns zunächst dem implied reader: Dabei gilt es sich zu vergegenwärtigen, dass enkomiastische Dichtung in der Absicht verfasst wurde, bei der erwarteten Leserschaft Anklang und im Idealfall auch finanzielle Patronage zu finden.[13] Einhergehend wurde demnach auch von einem idealen Rezipienten ausgegangen, der sich am vorgelegten Werk erfreuen sollte, sich diesem aber auch mit einer Erwartungshaltung und Ansprüchen nähern würde.[14] Für die Encomiastica und die Austrias als erzählende hexametrische Dichtung bedeutete dies, sich im Vergleich mit den modellhaften Prätexten antiker Vorbilder (Homer, Vergil, Lukan, Statius oder Claudian) bewähren zu müssen. Als qualitativ hochwertig eingestuft wurden jene Werke, die bekannte Strukturelemente adaptierten und für ihren eigenen Erzählduktus fruchtbar machten.[15] Zu denken ist dabei sowohl an syntaktische, semantische oder inhaltliche Anspielungen als auch an die Übernahme bekannter literarischer Topoi wie Musenanrufe, Rüstungsszenen, Götterkonzile oder sogar an die geschickte Inkorporation ganzer Szenen. Der implied reader der Encomiastica und der Austrias sollte also durch das sprachlich-stilistische Arrangement der historischen Ereignisse in epischer Manier überzeugt werden. Damit das Erkennen von Imitation und ihrer Funktion gelingen konnte, wurde beim implied reader insbesondere die Kompetenz intertextuell vergleichender Lektüre vorausgesetzt. Ein solcher Leser war befähigt, die Imitation des Prätexts durch den Verfasser mit seiner eigenen Rezeption zusammenzuführen. In besonderem Maße als einflussreich erwies sich der Donatus auctus, eine von Humanisten selbst erweiterte Version der bei Servius vorliegenden Vita Vergils, in der dieser als Hofdichter des Augustus präsentiert wurde und der so viel Autorität beigemessen wurde, dass sie den Drucken von Vergils Werken vorangestellt wurde und damit das Bild des Dichters und der Epik generell fortan prägte.[16] Der implied reader ist bei der Deutung der begegnenden Reminiszenzen nicht auf eine im Text verankerte Erklärung angewiesen, die semantischen, strukturellen und inhaltlichen Anleihen erschließen sich ihm dank seines Bildungshorizonts. Hier kommt es nun zu einem Zirkelschluss: Die vorliegende epische Dichtung wurde komponiert, um Gefallen zu finden. Ihre Komposition umfasste zu einem erheblichen Teil Elemente, die eine Konstruktionsleistung und spezifisches Vorwissen erforderten. Weil der in der Vorstellung des Verfassers existente und im Text fixierte implied reader das leisten kann, charakterisieren ihn ebenjene Textelemente, die einer solchen Sinnkonstruktion durch die Lesenden bedürfen. Für Untersuchungen zur Konfiguration des implied reader bedeutet das, dass sie dort nachvollzogen werden kann, wo die Sinnebene des Texts durch kulturelle Codes erweitert wird, die Deutung dieser Referenzen aber den Lesenden überlassen bleibt. Die folgenden Beispiele sind exemplarisch für den jeweiligen implied reader zu betrachten, eine vollständige Analyse aller begegnenden Sinninterferenzen würde den gegebenen Rahmen überschreiten.

Vergleiche in FriedrichsRede (Encomiastica Biiiir)

Eine naheliegende Möglichkeit zur Näherung an den implied reader bieten Gleichnisse und Analogien. Diese werden nicht nur zur Veranschaulichung erzählter oder nicht erzählter Ereignisse verwendet, sondern dienen der Erzählung auf vielfältige Weise, indem sie den Text strukturieren, die Handlung verlangsamen, die Spannung erhöhen, pro- und analeptisch auf Ereignisse hinweisen, die Interpretation unterstützen und die Gelehrsamkeit der Verfasser offenbaren. Insbesondere können sie aber auch dazu verwendet werden, auftretende Figuren zu charakterisieren.[17] Einer solchen über ein Gleichnis erfolgenden Figurencharakterisierung begegnen wir in Friedrichs Rede zu Beginn des zweiten Buchs der Encomiastica (Biiiir). Der alternde Kaiser wendet sich darin an die versammelten Reichsfürsten und fordert sie aufgrund seines fortgeschrittenen Alters zur Wahl eines passenden Nachfolgers auf:

Sim licet ipse senex, quando vel grandior aetas Consiliis prodesse potest, si viribus uti Non liceat, Pylius sic post duo secula Nestor Profuit, iratus cum non pugnaret Achilles, Sub Phrigiis caderent Danai (…)
Mag ich selbst auch ein Greis sein, zuweilen kann ziemlich vorgerücktes Alter mit Ratschlägen nützlich sein, wenn es nicht gestattet ist, auf die Kräfte zurückzugreifen. So war der pylische Nestor nach zwei Menschenaltern nützlich, als der erzürnte Achilles nicht kämpfte, als die Danaer unter den Phrygiern fielen (…) Übersetzung: Ebert  

Friedrich, der das einberufene Konzil überzeugen will, einen geeigneten Nachfolger zu wählen, sieht sich zukünftig als Ratgeber eines neuen Machthabers, der bei Bedarf mit seinem Erfahrungsschatz aushelfen wird. Der Vergleich mit Nestor dient an dieser Stelle nicht bloß dazu, den Publikumserwartungen auf formal struktureller Ebene Genüge zu tun, die Referenzen bieten auch eine inhaltlich passende Adaption der Folie. Beim herangezogenen Nestor handelt es sich nämlich um den mythischen Herrscher Pylos’, der in Homers Odyssee den jungen Telemachos auf der Suche nach seinem Vater beriet und in der Ilias im Streit zwischen Agamemnon und Achilles vermittelte, wo er darüber hinaus an mehreren Stellen explizit (2,337; 7,328; 9,53; 10,204) als Exempel eines weisen Ratgebers begegnet. Auch die Referenz auf Achills Rückzug aus dem Kampf um Troia als Beispiel einer Situation, in der Waffengewalt keinen Erfolg verheißen kann, wurde mit Bedacht gewählt: Denn als ebenjener sich in der Ilias aus Zorn auf den griechischen König Agamemnon weigerte zu kämpfen, wandte sich das Kriegsglück gegen die Belagerer und es schien, als könnten die Troianer die Oberhand behalten. Der griechische Vorstoß im achten Gesang der Ilias wurde zurückgeschlagen und es kam zu einer troianischen Gegenoffensive, an deren Ende Zeus bis zur Rückkehr des Achilles sogar ein weiteres Vorstoßen der Troianer verkündete (Ilias 8,471-483). Obwohl es den Griechen damit strenggenommen nicht verboten war zu kämpfen, stand es ihnen aufgrund der göttlichen Bestimmung dennoch nicht frei, sich ihrer militärischen Stärke zu bedienen. Friedrichs Consiliis prodesse potest, si viribus uti // Non liceat bleibt damit nicht nur eine allgemeine Sentenz, sondern wird durch die im Vergleich genutzten Heroen mit einer konkreten Situation in Verbindung gebracht. Die Stilisierung Friedrichs als weiser Ratgeber und die Betonung des aus seinem Alter erwachsenden Mehrwerts laufen ohne Kenntnis des Prätextes ins Leere, ihr volles Potential entfaltet die Rede nur bei Rezipienten, die mit Nestor und Achill vertraut sind. Darüber hinaus könnten Lesende in der Anspielung auf Nestor auch ein verstecktes Lob Friedrichs finden: Denn während der König von Pylos in der Ilias (9,53) Achill mit seiner Rede nicht zur Rückkehr ins Kampfgeschehen bewegen kann, gelingt es Friedrich in den Encomiastica, die anwesenden Fürsten von der Wahl eins Ko-Regenten zu überzeugen.

Explizit wird das Spiel mit der kulturellen Kompetenz der Lesenden auch an der adaptierten Inkorporation von Szenen aus den antiken Vorbildern in den eigenen Text. Plakativ dafür begegnet in den Encomiastica unter anderem das Flammenprodigium Maximilians (Biiiiv). Nachdem Friedrich seiner bereits bekannten Rede noch ein Gebet angefügt hatte, wanderte eine Flamme vom Himmel auf Maximilians Kopf. Die Anwesenden deuten dies als göttliches Zeichen und wählen Maximilian daraufhin zum König. Die inhaltliche Vorlage dafür bot die Aeneis (2,679-693).

Encomiastica BiiiivAeneis 2,679-93
Vix ea fatus erat, coelo cum flamma sereno Arsit et in medium visa est descendere longis Tractibus, ac rutilos circum depascere crines Maximiliane tuos, qualis coelestis Iulo Lambebat crines quondam sacer ignis, et oraTalia vociferans gemitu tectum omne replebat,               cum subitum dictuque oritur mirabile monstrum. namque manus inter maestorumque ora parentum   ecce levis summo de vertice visus Iuli                                          fundere lumen apex, tactuque innoxia mollis              lambere flamma comas et circum tempora pasci. (…) Vix ea fatus erat senior, subitoque(…)
  Er hatte dies kaum gesagt gehabt, als plötzlich am heiteren Himmel eine Flamme entbrannte und mit langen Bewegungen herabschreiten und rundum deine, Maximilian, rötlichen Haare abweiden gesehen wurde, wie einst das heilige Feuer dem Iulus das himmlische Haar und Gesicht ableckte. Übersetzung: Ebert  So rief laut sie, das ganze Haus mit der Klage erfüllend, als es ein Vorzeichen plötzlich gab, nur ein Wunder zu nennen. Denn vor den Augen und zwischen den Händen der traurigen Eltern, schau, da sah von Iulus’ Scheitel man oben ein zartes Flämmchen ein Licht verströmen, ihn, ohne zu schaden, berühren, züngeln ums weiche Haar und sich fortfressen rings um die Schläfen. (…) Kaum hatte dieses der Greis gesagt, (…) Text und Übersetzung: Holzberg 2015  

Aeneas, der bereit ist, sich in den Kampf zu stürzen, wird dort von seiner Frau Kreusa aufgefordert, zunächst den gemeinsamen Sohn Iulus, Vater Anchises und sie zu schützen, als sich plötzlich auf Iulus’ Kopf eine Flamme zeigt. Die semantischen Anspielungen der Encomiastica auf ihre Vorlage sind dabei kaum zu übersehen, teilweise erfolgt sogar eine wortwörtliche Übernahme: So wird mit Vix ea fatus erat in beiden Texten der Sprechakt des jeweiligen Vaters – in der Aeneis Anchises, in den Encomiastica Friedrich – bezeichnet, auch die Art, mit der sich die Flammen auf Maximilians/Iulus’ Haupt den Haaren annähern, ohne für Verletzungen zu sorgen, wird mit lambere durch das idente Idiom und mit depascere bzw. pasci durch Kompositum und Simplex desselben Verbs angezeigt. Ferner spiegeln die Encomiastica mit der Verwendung des indikativischen cum-Satzes, der wie in der Vorlage einem vorhergehenden Sprechakt folgt, die Syntax der Aeneisstelle. Darüber hinaus wird ebenso die abwärts gerichtete Bewegung der Flamme rezipiert: Berührte sie in der Aeneis Iulus’ Haar summo de vertice, also vom Scheitel abwärts, so steigt sie in den Encomiastica vom Himmel auf Maximilian herab (descendere). Betont wurde in beiden Fällen mit visa bzw. visus auch die Autopsie des Erzählers (in der Aeneis handelt es sich dabei um den referierenden Aeneas, in den Encomiastica um den epischen Erzähler). Die für ein bildungsaffines Publikum offenkundige inhaltliche Parallelisierung wird hier also durch eindeutige Signale auf semantisch-syntaktischer Ebene gestärkt. Die Intention hinter einem solchen Aufbau ist klar: Maximilian soll als neuer Iulus, der in einer extradiegetischen Unterweltsepisode der Aeneis (6,679-892) als Stammvater der Iulier eingeführt wird, mit einer ebenso glorreichen Zukunft präsentiert werden. Diese dem Text innewohnende Deutungsvariante bleibt implizit, sie wahrzunehmen bleibt Aufgabe der Lesenden, die nur bei ausreichender Kenntnis der Prätexte gelingen kann. Einer ähnlich plakativen Parallelisierung bediente sich Cimbriacus später beim Rückgriff fama, die, indem sie umherfliegend Maximilians Wahl zum König verkündet, die Missgunst gegen diesen schürt (Bviir). Auch dafür findet sich die Vorlage in der Aeneis, konkret bei der Verbreitung des Gerüchts von Didos und Aeneas’ Liebschaft (4,173ff.).

Ekphrastische Artefaktbeschreibung (Encomiastica Biv-Biiir)

Ein weiteres Strukturelement, das Rückschlüsse zur Konfiguration des textimmanenten Lesers ermöglicht, findet sich in der Artefaktekphrasis. Unter diesem Begriff wird die verbale Beschreibung von Gegenständen, die von Menschen oder Göttern hergestellt wurden, verstanden. Wurde die Ekphrasis vormals als retardierendes Element betrachtet, so wird in der jüngeren Forschung die Möglichkeit zur Strukturierung der Handlung (etwa durch intra- oder extradiegetische Ana- und Prolepsen) betont. Ein besonderes Mittel der Darstellungstechnik ist dabei nicht selten der Wissensvorsprung der Lesenden, die eine Darstellung zu deuten wissen, gegenüber den ahnungslosen Figuren, die sich an der Gestalt des Gegenstandes erfreuen, dessen Handlung aber nicht korrekt interpretieren können (wie etwa Aeneas im achten Buch beim Betrachten des ihm geschenkten Schildes und der darauf dargestellten künftigen Großtaten Roms Aeneis 8,626-731).[18] Ähnlich wie der Vergleich bietet also auch die Artefaktekphrasis die Möglichkeit, auf einen gemeinsamen Bildungshorizont anzuspielen und so die Sinnebene der Erzählung zu erweitern. Cimbriacus bediente sich dieses Mittels am Ende des ersten Buchs der Encomiastica, wo ein in der Bartholomäuskirche hängendes Tapis beschrieben wird (Biv-Biiir). Dabei wird zunächst in einer praeteritio betont, dass dem Erzähler, durch dessen Fokalisierung das Tapis wahrgenommen wird, die Familiengeschichte der Habsburger wieder in Erinnerung gerufen wurde: Sie muss dementsprechend auf dem Tapis dargestellt sein, wird aber aus Gründen, die wohl mit der Inszenierung der literarischen persona des Verfassers zusammenhängen, an dieser Stelle nicht vertieft. Anschließend wird eine Art Himmelskarte beschrieben, auf der die Bewegungen der Gestirne dargestellt werden, die durch den Rückgriff auf mythologische Terminologie antikisiert werden. Die ferner beschriebene Darstellung der Liebschaften von Andromeda und Perseus sowie Bacchus und Ariadne bzw. Theseus und derselben finden ein prominentes Vorbild in Catulls carmen 64. Ebenjene Episode wird dort auf einer Decke des Hochzeitssofas des Peleus und der Thetis abgebildet. Schließlich endet die Tapisbeschreibung mit einer Art Weltkarte, in der Bezüge zwischen der jeweiligen geografischen Region und den Erzählungen antiker Mythen hergestellt werden. Klecker[19] erläuterte die begegnenden Darstellungen bereits in ihrem Aufsatz: Der historische Beginn verweise mit dem Stichwort genus zunächst auf den Schild des Aeneas (Aeneis 8,628f.): genus omne futurae // stirpis ab Ascanio („von Ascanius an die künftigen Geschlechter“). Beschrieben werde aber eher der Schild des Achill, da mit Sonne, Gestirnen und Mond Inhalte des Hephaistosschildes aus der Ilias (18,483 – 489) angeführt würden. Insgesamt könne die Ekphrasis als Imitation Homers verstanden werden und entspreche dabei der geläufigen Deutung des homerischen Schildes als „Abbild der Welt“, die sich in der pseudoplutarchischen Schrift De Homero (176,1), aber auch im armorum iudicium in Ovids Metamorphosen (Met. 13,110: clipeus vasti caelatus imagine mundi, „der Schild geschmückt mit dem Bild der weiten Welt“) findet. Bereits antike Ekphrasen folgten nach Klecker dieser Interpretation und wirkten ihrerseits auf die Encomiastica: So begegnet ein Bild des Kosmos sowohl auf den Palasttoren der regia Solis Ovids (Met. 2, 1 – 18) als auch auf dem Gewebe der Proserpina bei Claudian (De raptu Proserpinae 1, 259-265). Cimbriacus’ Schlangenpaar (geminos sinuosis orbibus angues) am Firmament verweise auf die gängige Vorstellung, gemäß der am Nordpol eine Schlange zwischen zwei Bären oder Wagen zu sehen sei: Zurückführen ließe sich das davon abweichende Schlangenpaar auf eine Fehlinterpretation des Epitheton geminus, das er auf die Bären bezogen hätte, oder auf eine Inspiration durch Ovid, der in den Fasti (6,736 gemino … angue) den Serpentarius mit zwei Schlangen darstellte. Erwarte man nun eine Angabe zum großen und kleinen Bären (worauf minorem weise), so zeige die Opposition sublimem – Styx, dass offenkundig an Nord- und Südpol gedacht worden sei. Vorbild sei die Erdbeschreibung Vergils in den Georgica (1,233-250) gewesen, die Cimbriacus umgekhrt habe: cernere erat et geminos sinuosis orbibus angues, // sublimemque Arcton, condit Styx atra minorem („Zu sehen war das Schlangenpaar mit verschlungenen Kreisen, // der Arctos in der Höhe, den kleineren hüllt ein die schwarze Styx“). Nach der anschließenden Erdbeschreibung und den mit ihr verbundenen Klimazonen wird nach Klecker mit dem wolkenlosen Olymp, der sich den Wetterumschwüngen gegenüber immun präsentiert, ein seit der Odyssee (6,43-45) traditionelles Bild evoziert. Der mit dem Eridanus als Grab des Phaeton einsetzende Flusskatalog sei von Ovid inspiriert, in dessen Metamorphosen (Met. 2,241-259) der durch den abstürzenden Phaethon verursachte Weltbrand zu einem solche überleitete. Cimbriacus habe dann eine Formulierung Lucans genutzt, um den langsamen Fluss der Saône zu beschreiben, den bereits Caesar (De bell. Gall. 1, 12 incredibilis lenitas) bemerkt hatte. Diese Formulierung betone die paradoxe Umkehrung der Fließgeschwindigkeiten von Rhone und Saône und symbolisiere die Macht der thessalischen Hexen (Bellum civile 6,475): „Rhodanumque morantem praecipitavit Arar“ („die Saône trieb die zögernde Rhone voran“). Spercheios und Inachus werden als Kombination von Flussgöttern dargestellt, möglicherweise inspiriert von Ovids Metamorphosen (Met. 1, 579 und 583), während die meerähnliche Inszenierung des Gardasees wahrscheinlich auf Vergils Georgica (2,160: fluctibus et fremitu adsurgens, Benace, marino, „wie Meer aufbrausend mit tosenden Fluten“) basiere. Der Avernersee wird als traditioneller Eingang in die Unterwelt genannt, sodass die Ekphrasis vom Himmel zur Unterwelt führe. Das Sternbild der Corona borealis werde ferner als Möglichkeit genützt, die Ekphrasis der Decke auf dem Brautbett der Thetis in Catulls carmen 64 zu evozieren. Mit der Erwähnung der Schutzfunktion der Alpen (grandi vertice montes // ut quae Pannonios Alpis flectuntur in arcus // contra barbaricos vel munimenta furores) liege außerdem eine zeitgenössische Anspielung auf die Türkenbedrohung vor. In der Hervorhebung der Giganten, ihres Gefängnisses und ihres Umsturzversuches, biete die Ekphrasis darüber hinaus ein Lob Friedrichs, der von Cimbriacus mehrfach entsprechend konventioneller panegyrischer Topik mit dem Gigantenbesieger Jupiter verglichen wird. So werden etwa die an die Ekphrasis anschließenden Feierlichkeiten aus Anlass der Königswahl mit dem Siegesmahl nach dem Gigantenkampf verglichen.

Kleckers Ausführungen zu den Vorlagen für Cimbriacus’ Ekphrasis verdeutlichen, dass die Beschreibung des Tapis nicht bloß als Strukturelement zur Episierung des Textes diente (sie fehlte nämlich in der ersten Fassung noch!): Die ihr innewohnende literarische Qualität beruht auf dem kunstvollen Einbau intertextueller Referenzen, vollumfänglich geschätzt kann die Artefaktekphrasis daher nur von Lesenden werden, die im Stande sind, diese Anspielungen zu deuten und mit dem eigenen Vorwissen zusammenzuführen. Die Tapisbeschreibung liefert darüber hinaus einen Beleg für die eingangs erwähnte Anschaulichkeit, die der direkten Ansprache des narratee durch den narrator entspringt: Die genutzten Phrasen  „illic (…) vidisses“ (dort hättest du sehen können) und „illic (…) spectasses“ (dort hättest du betrachten können) sind topisch und dienen neben der Profilierung des Erzählers anhand seiner Autopsie – er vermag den Abwesenden das Gesehene so klar zu schildern, dass für sie der Eindruck des eigene Betrachtens entsteht – auch der Inszenierung des Publikums. Als solches erscheinen in direkte Anreden an das Personal der epischen Handlung auch Friedrich III. und Maximilian. Da der epische Erzähler in dieser Form auch Personen ansprechen und ihnen Ruhm verheißen kann, die allein der Welt seiner Erzählung angehören (ein gutes Beispiel dafür ist die Anrede von Nisus und Euryalus, Aen. 9,446ff.), ist der Status dieser Anreden Friedrichs III. und Maximilians schwer zu bestimmen, dient aber jedenfalls der Modellierung der Autorpersona. Interesse weckt darüber hinaus auch die Apostrophe an den venezianischen Gesandten Antonio Boldù am Ende des Epos (Dvir). Boldù, der sich im Konflikt zwischen Friedrich III. und Matthias Corvinus als Vermittler bewährte[20], tritt nicht als Figur der epischen Erzählung in Erscheinung, die Apostrophe an ihn kann daher nur extradiegetischen Wert besitzen. Da er ferner als Protagonist zukünftiger Dichtung besungen und dadurch Friedrich und Maximilian in Teilen sogar angeglichen wird, darf vermutet werden, dass es sich auch hier um ein Element zur Modellierung der Autorpersona handelt.

Gastmahl und Auftritt des Barden Enypeus (Austrias Divv)

Bankette zählen zu den zentralen Strukturelementen antiker Epik. Sie bieten die Gelegenheit, die Protagonisten aufeinandertreffen zu lassen, sie zu charakterisieren und neue Handlungsstränge einzuführen. Neben ausführlichen Beschreibungen des Schauplatzes, der Figuren und der Unterhaltung bei Tisch bieten sie dem Verfasser die Möglichkeit, metapoetische bzw. extradiegetische Überlegungen zu platzieren. Auch, wenn sich kein fixierter Ablauf für Bankettszenen identifizieren lässt, ähnelt sich ihr Aufbau aufgrund der Orientierung an Vergils Aeneis dennoch stark. Ein typisches Element solcher Bankettszene stellt daher auch der Auftritt eines Barden dar.[21] Dieser zählt zu den sogenannten Erzählerfiguren epischer Werke, die eine Vermittlerrolle zwischen dem Erzähler und der erzählten Welt einnehmen. Sie sind Teil der dargestellten Welt, dieser aber auch in gewisser Weise entrückt, da sie die Tätigkeit des epischen Erzählers widerspiegeln. Die Einführung solcher Figuren ermöglicht dem Erzähler eine Pause und lässt den Eindruck entstehen, dass nicht er selbst spreche.[22] Zum Auftritt eines solchen Barden kommt es auch zu Beginn des dritten Buchs der Austrias. Im Zuge eines in Augsburg abgehaltenes Abendessen, dessen Beginn inklusive der typischen Elemente (Schilderung der Sitzordnung, Beschreibung der Speisen…) das Ende des zweiten Buchs markiert, tritt Enypeus auf. Dieser besingt die Türken und ihre Geschichte, die ihren Höhepunkt in der Eroberung Konstantinopels fand. Die Darbietung endet mit einem Aufruf zum Kreuzzug, den Maximilian auch zusichert. Wie Füssel[23] bereits feststellte, liegt mit dem zum Auftritt des Enypeus überleitenden Vers postquam exempta fames eine wortwörtliche Übernahme aus der Aeneis vor (1,216). Darüber hinaus machte Füssel auch auf die Reminiszenzen zum Auftritt des Barden Iopas in der Aeneis, die eine Assoziation zu Vergils Werk sicherstellen sollten, aufmerksam. Iopas tritt in der Aeneis im Zuge eines von Dido veranstalteten Gastmahls zur Begrüßung der Troianer in Erscheinung. Wie in der Aeneis verfügt auch der Sänger der Austrias über ein attraktives Erscheinungsbild, ebenso wird das Erklingen seines Instruments, das dem Vorbild folgend auch bei Bartolini vergoldet ist, durch personat mit demselben Ausdruck bezeichnet. Während Iopas in der Aeneis allerdings laut dem epischen Erzähler die Kreisbahn des Mondes vorträgt, wird Enypeus dies in der Austrias explizit nicht tun. Doch auch die Negation des naturphilosophischen Vortrags ist eine Anspielung, wird dabei mit canit errantem Lunam doch ein weiteres direktes Zitat eingebaut.

Austrias DivvAeneis 1,740ff.
Personat aurata testudine pulcher Enypheus, Non canit errantem Lunam, non furta Tonantis, nec iam vulgatos Electrae Atlantidos ignes scilicet ut magno cretus Iove Dardanus isque aedit Eryctonium, nec Caucason unde Promethei est fabula Cyrrhaeo flammam rapientis ab axe, Parrhasiam sed enim gentem Pontumque nivalem armatosque Asiae populos Turcasque canebat horribiles bello, atque alto sic incipit ore:(…)(…) cithara crinitus Iopas personat aurata, docuit quem maximus Atlas. hic canit errantem lunam solisque labores, unde hominum genus et pecudes, unde imber et ignes, Arcturum pluviasque Hyadas geminosque Triones, quid tantum Oceano properent se tingere soles hiberni, vel quae tardis mora noctibus obstet; ingeminant plausu Tyrii, Troesque sequuntur. nec non et vario noctem sermone trahebat infelix Dido longumque bibebat amorem, multa super Priamo rogitans, super Hectore multa; nunc quibus Aurorae venisset filius armis, nunc quales Diomedis equi, nunc quantus Achilles  
Es ertönt mit der vergoldeten Lyra der schöne Enypeus, er besingt nicht den umherwandernden Mond, nicht verstohlenen Liebschaften des Donnernden, nicht die schon bekannt gewordenen Feuer der Atlastochter Elektra, wie der vom großen Iupiter ersprossene Dardanus auch den Erichthonius zeugte baute, nicht den Kaukasus woher die Fabel des die Flamme vom cirrhaeischen Himmel raubenden Prometheus stammt, sondern das arkadische Volk und das schneebedeckte Pontus und die bewaffneten Völker Asiens und die im Krieg schrecklichen Türken besang er und so beginnt er mit erhabenem Antlitz: (…) Übersetzung: EbertDer Schüler des Atlas, Iopas, der mit dem langen Haar, lässt tönen die goldene Lyra, singt vom wandernden Mond und von den Leiden der Sonne, von dem Ursprung der Menschen und Tiere, des Regens, des Feuers, von Arktur, von dem Regengestirn, von den beiden Trionen, singt auch, warum im Winter ins Meer zu tauchen die Sonne eilt und was, wenn die Nacht spät kommt, ihren Anbruch verzögert; Beifall spendeten mehrfach die Tyrier, dann auch die Troer. Dido, die unglückselige, zog diese Nacht in die Länge durch die Gespräche und sog in sich auf lang währende Liebe; viel über Priamus wollte sie wissen und viel über Hektor, dann, mit welchen Waffen der Sohn Auroras herbeikam, dann, wie des Diomedes Gespann war, wie kampfstark Achilles. Text und Übersetzung: Holzberg 2015    

Füssels Beobachtung kann erweitert werden: Die semantische Gleichheit sichert die Assoziation zur Aeneis und nimmt den Gegenstand des Referats, den Untergang einer Stadt, vorweg. Neben der sprachlichen Anspielung bietet die Austrias aber auch eine strukturelle Reminiszenz zur Aeneis. In der Austrias listet der epische Erzähler eine Reihe von Antithemen, die in Prätexten bereits behandelt wurden, ehe der Aufstieg der Türken als Enypeus’ Gegenstand benannt wird und dessen Vortrag beginnt. In der Aeneis werden die Inhalte von Iopas’ Vortrag innerhalb von fünf Versen gelistet, ohne dabei vom Erzähler konkretisiert zu werden, anschließend erwähnt der epische Erzähler Didos Fragen zu bekannten Heroen des troianischen Kriegs. Erst ihr Wunsch (Aen. 1,754), vom Fall Troias zu hören, der in Aeneas’ Bericht der erlebten Katastrophe mündet, erscheint als direkte Rede. Der Erzähler der Austrias antizipiert mit Non canit errantem Lunam nicht nur Enypeus’ folgenden Vortrag, sondern bietet damit zugleich eine Anspielung auf den Inhalt der Aeneis, in der ein naturphilosophischer Vortrag ebenso fehlt wie in der Austrias. Dazu werden in beiden Texten zunächst alternative Gegenstand evoziert, die bloß als Überleitung zum eigentlichen relevanten Stoff dienen. Die Praeteritio der Austrias ist in ihrer Brückenfunktion damit eine Referenz zur Erzählstruktur der Aeneis. Eine solche literarische Feinheit erschließt sich lediglich bei umfassender Kenntnis der Aeneis und erfüllt ihren Zweck, das Hervorrufen positiver Bewertungen, ausschließlich dann, wenn ein Publikum erwartet wird, das die kunstfertige Adaptierung der Vorlage zu schätzen weiß. Wie Füssel weiter feststellte, handle es sich bei den Berichten des Aeneas (im 2. Buch der Aeneis) und Odysseus (9.-12- Buch der Odyssee) im Gegensatz zu jenem des Enypeus um notwendige Ergänzungen, die als Analepsen zum Verständnis des eigentlichen Erzählstranges beitragen. Enypeus’ Bericht diene dagegen als Exkurs zu einer extradiegetischen Glorifizierung potenzieller, zukünftiger Leistungen des Protagonisten. Aus narratologischer Perspektive erfüllt der Auftritt des Barden hier also für die Erzählung keine unmittelbare Funktion, er bietet Lesenden mit einem hohen literarischen Vorwissen aber eine Deutungshilfe zur Figur Maximilians.

Dass sich die Konfiguration des implied reader auch in vermeintlichen Nebensächlichkeiten offenbaren kann und nicht ausschließlich über die Referenz auf einen geteilten Bildungskanon erfolgen muss, zeigt die Erwähnung eines gewissen Marianus als Teilnehmer des Gastmahls, dessen rhetorische Fähigkeiten und Ansehen beim Kaiser nachdrücklich betont werden. Dieser schon in der Glosse als Marianus Bartolini identifizierte Teilnehmer kann als päpstlicher Nuntius bei Maximilian und Onkel des Verfassers belegt werde[24], in der epischen Glorifizierung scheinen der vollständige Name und die Position des Verherrlichten aber nicht auf (Diiir-Divr). Als Hinweis, um welchen Marianus es sich handelt, dient den Lesenden lediglich folgende Bemerkung (Diiir):

Perusina domus (…) Haec patria est olli, nobisque et sanguine ab uno Aedimur (…)
Das Haus Perugia, (…) Dieses ist für jenen und uns die Heimat und vom gleichen Blut stammen wir ab (…) Übersetzung: Ebert  

Marianus wird mit einer anderen, nicht näher benannten Entität, nämlich dem Erzähler in Verbindung gebracht. Es darf dabei vermutet werden, dass das Lob des Marianus nicht bloß dessen Andenken, sondern mindestens im gleichen Maße der Stilisierung des Verfassers diente. Damit diese Stilisierung nun nicht ins Leere läuft und der erwähnte Marianus identifiziert werden kann, wird eine Rezeptionshaltung vorausgesetzt, in der die Lesenden den epischen Erzähler als literarisches Ich des Verfassers Ricardo Bartolini deuten. Sichergestellt wird dies durch den Hinweis auf Perugia als Heimat des epischen Erzählers. Zu denken wäre bei der Sequenz um Marianus auch an die Evokation des Onkel-Neffe Verhältnisses von Plinius maior und minor. Wie sein Onkel, dessen Naturalis historia das naturwissenschaftliche Verständnis des Humanismus prägte, trat auch Plinius minor als Schriftsteller in Erscheinung. Neben einer literarisch konzipierten Briefsammlung verfasste er ein Herrscherlob auf Kaiser Trajan, bekannt als Panegyricus. Eine Anlehnung Ricardo Bartolinis, der danach strebte, seine literarische persona als panegyrische Erzählerin von Maximilians Ruhm zu inszenieren, an Plinius minor scheint daher nicht abwegig. Um das Signal zur Identifikation des Erzählers als literarischer persona des Verfassers und in weiterer Folge die Identität des gepriesenen Marianus zu erkennen, bedarf es einer Leserschaft, die sowohl die nötige Vertrautheit mit den literarischen Konventionen, das heißt die nötige Sensibilität für Hinweise dieser Art, als auch das Wissen um die Abstimmung Ricardo Bartolinis aus Perugia besitzt. Beides konnte bei einer untereinander vernetzten, aus Humanisten bestehenden Leserschaft vorausgesetzt werden.

Intended readers

Wenn der intended reader wie bei Schmid als außerhalb der Textwelt stehend definiert ist, so soll hier unter Textwelt die der epischen Erzählung verstanden werden. An den gebotenen (kursorischen) Überblick über die textinterne Inszenierung des idealen Rezipienten schließt sich daher die Frage an, wer außerhalb dieser Textwelt, also in den das Werk begleitenden Paratexten, als potenzieller Leser angesprochen wurde.

Für die Encomiastica finden sich mit dem Widmungsbrief Johannes Camers’, Professor an der theologischen Fakultät Wiens[25], an Kaiser Maximilian und dem Protrepticon ad libellum zwei in dieser Hinsicht erhellende Begleittexte. Camers preist Cimbriacus dabei als herausragenden Dichter (vates eximius), betont zugleich aber auch seine eigene Rolle bei der Veröffentlichung des den Kaiser rühmenden Textes. Interessant für die Frage nach dem intended reader begegnet dabei folgende Äußerung (Aiv):

Dabitur deinceps opera(…) Ut caetera ab eodem vate edita carmina, quae plurima extant, in lucem veniant. Legant interea docti omnes in hiis Encomiasticis virtutes tuas, teque parentem bonorum hominum diligant, venerentur, colant
Es wird sich alsdann Mühe gegeben, dass die übrigen vom selben Dichter herausgegebenen Gedichte, von denen sehr viele vorhanden sind, ans Tageslicht kommen. Inzwischen mögen alle Gelehrten in diesen Encomiastica deine Tugenden nachlesen unddich als Vater der guten Menschen schätzen, anbeten, verehren. Übersetzung: Ebert  

Es werden hier explizit die docti, die humanistische Bildungselite, als Leser angeführt, während Maximilian selbst als potenzieller Leser nicht erwähnt wird. Die literarische Qualität des oben gerühmten vates Cimbriacus und des von ihm verfassten Texts besitzen für Maximilian nur mittelbare Relevanz, eine mögliche Freude des Kaisers beim Lesen des Textes wird nicht thematisiert. Der für Maximilian aus dem Text erwachsenden Mehrwert wird in der Lektüre durch andere verortet, die unter dem Eindruck des Gelesenen zur Verehrung des Herrschers veranlasst werden sollen. Passend dazu heißt es auch, der Drucker Aldus möge die großartigen Taten Maximilians und seines Vaters für die Menschen zugänglich machen (emitteret in manus hominum). Zweifellos besteht die theoretische Möglichkeit, dass diese zeitgenössische Einschätzung den vom Poeten angelegten intended reader völlig verfehlt (wie auch der Poet einen implied reader konfigurieren kann, der nichts mit dem empirischen Leser zu tun hat – die Sinnkonstruktion auf Seiten der Lesenden ist dann zwangsläufig zum Scheitern verurteilt). Wie das dem Werk ebenfalls vorangestellte Protrepticon ad libellum zeigt, ist dies bei Camers Widmung aber keineswegs der Fall: Schon der Erstfassung des Werks war eine Buchanrede beigegeben worden[26], die nur wenig Differenzen zu der von Camers herausgegebenen Zweitfassung aufweist.[27] Gemeinsam ist beiden Fassungen der inhaltliche Duktus: Wenn das personifizierte Werk dem Schicksal entgehen will, als Alltagsgegenstand missbraucht zu werden, möge es sich für seine Langlebigkeit die richtigen Unterstützer suchen (Enc. Aiir):

Si non vis calamos severiores, Si non vis domini pati asteriscos Et tantum properas foras abire, Non vis esse diutius, libelle, Et cum grammaticis statim cathedris Explosus miser in graves coquinas Ad scombros venies salariorum. Ridebunt scioli mihi papyros Et frustra nimium perire noctes, Patronum nisi habebis Hermolaon, Scitum (Iuppiter!) et bonum poetam, (…)
Wenn du nicht die ziemlich strengen Stifte, wenn du nicht die kritischen Zeichen des Meisters aushalten willst, und lediglich eilst in die Welt fortzugehen, willst du nicht mehr länger existieren, Büchlein. Und wenn du sofort missbilligt von den gelehrten Schreibtischen als elendes in beschwerliche Küchen zu den Makrelen der Salzfischhändler kommen. Die Besserwisser werden lachen, dass das Papier und die Nächte mir allzu vergeblich zugrunde gehen, wenn du nicht Hermolaos einen kundigen (bei Iupiter!) und guten Dichter als Schutzherren haben wirst. Übersetzung: Ebert  

Als Schirmherren werden in beiden Fassungen Humanisten, die am Hof oder in der Lehre tätig waren, angeführt. Die in der ersten Fassung noch begegnenden Marcantonio Coccia Sabello und Giorgio Merula werden in der zweiten Fassung nicht mehr erwähnt, in beiden Versionen genannt werden dagegen Ermolao Barbaro, Filippo Buonaccorsi (auch bekannt als Callimachus Experiens) und Giulio Pomponio Leto. Es ist zu vermuten, dass Sabello und Merula schlicht den Kürzungen an der zweiten Version des Protrepticon zum Opfer fielen. Aus der Tatsache, dass bei der Überarbeitung der Buchanrede aber nicht gänzlich auf namentliche Erwähnung zeitgenössischer Gelehrter verzichtet wurde, lässt sich schließen, dass das Protrepticon nicht bloß auf den Status einer metapoetischen Reflexion des Verfassers reduziert werden sollte, sondern auch als Ansuchen um Vermittlung gewertet werden sollte. Qua ihres humanistischen Bildungshorizonts verfügen die Angesprochenen über die Fähigkeiten zur Dechiffrierung der oben vorgestellten kulturellen Codes, sie sind befähigt die Rezeptionshaltung des implied reader einzunehmen. Zugleich besaßen sie, zumindest teilweise, die Möglichkeit, das Gelesene, oder besser gesagt den Verfasser des Gelesenen, an ihnen nahestehende Machthaber weiterzuempfehlen. Sie bildeten damit eine Schnittstelle zwischen Potentaten und Poet, denn wieder ist es nicht der im Werk glorifizierte Machthaber selbst, der als Leser oder Schirmherr des Textes angesprochen wird, sondern Mitglieder der Bildungselite.

Vergleichbare Exempla für das Ansuchen um Förderung finden sich, wenn der unmittelbare Kontext der Encomiastica verlassen wird. Auch im restlichen Œuvre des Cimbriacus treffen wir auf Dichtung, die Humanisten im Umfeld der Machthaber als intended reader präsentiert. Zu nennen gilt es dabei carmen 24 des Codex Fuchsmagen, wo dem bereits erwähnten Antonio Boldù eine umfangreichere, bessere Glorifizierung seiner Taten versprochen, sobald sich nur die sozioökonomischen Umstände des Dichters gebessert hätten:

(…) si tibi vacabit interdum legere hoc ineptiarum Non plus esse decem scias dierum Nec limae positum severiori; Quare mi veniam dabis, pusillum Mendae si quid erit tenebricosae. Censeri esuriens equit poeta, Qui gratis triviale carmen edens Nullis ad citharam movetur oestris
(…) wenn du zuweilen Zeit und Muße hast, dieses Stückchen Spielereien durchzulesen, dann sollst du wissen, dass es in nicht mehr als zehn Tagen entstanden und nicht besonders sorgfältig ausgefeilt worden ist; also wirst du mir verzeihen, wenn sich ein paar kleine, unerklärliche Schnitzer darin finden.  Über einen hungrigen Dichter kann man nicht urteilen, der, wenn er unbezahlt ein banales Gedicht verfasst, an der Lyra nicht von poetischen Begeisterungsstürmen mitgerissen wird. Text und Übersetzung: Projekt Fuchsmagen Universität Innsbruck: C. 24 | Codex Fuchsmagen (uibk.ac.at)    

Ähnliches lesen wir auch in carmen 26, dessen Adressat Kanzleimitarbeiter Bernhard Perger[28] war. Dort kritisiert Cimbriacus den Umstand, dass die kaiserlichen Köche und Flötenspieler ausreichend finanzielle Unterstützung erfahren würden, während er als Dichter kein Auslangen finde. Carmen 24 und 26 sind damit geradezu Paradebeispiele für den nach Patronage suchenden Dichter: Dieses Ansuchen um Förderung wird in beiden Fällen aber nicht direkt an den Kaiser, sondern an Teile einer humanistisch gebildeten Elite gerichtet, die als Bindeglied zwischen Potentat und Poet fungieren soll. Sie werden für die geschaffene Kunst als zugänglich erachtet, d.h. ihnen wird zugetraut, die entstandenen Texte im Sinne des Verfassers deuten zu können und zugleich wird ihnen das nötige Pouvoir attestiert, um die Karriere des Dichters zu fördern.

Cimbriacus’ metapoetische Kommentare zu den materiellen Verhältnissen eines Poeten und insbesondere der von ihm adressierte Personenkreis stellen keinen Sonderfall dar. Auch jene die Austrias begleitenden Paratexte präsentieren Humanisten mit Zugang zur Macht als intended reader. Bereits der dem Manuskript beigelegte Brief Bartolinis an den Drucker Matthias Schürer (datiert auf den 27. Juli 1515) nennt Mitglieder der Bildungselite als potenzielle Leser. Schürer wird im erwähnten Brief gebeten, dem Werk innenwohnende Fehler mit anderen eruditi zu sammeln, als solche eruditi müssen jene Personen verstanden werden, die über eruditio, also gelehrte Kenntnis, verfügen. Der gewählte Terminus identifiziert damit wortwörtlich andere Humanisten als intendierte Leserschaft. Bartolinis Ansinnen kam Jacob Spiegel, ein kaiserlicher Kanzleitmitarbeiter, der sich zum Zeitpunkt der Drucklegung im Umfeld Schürers aufhielt, nach. Seine Korrekturen (emendationes) wurden in einer im April 1516 erschienen Zweitauflage als Appendix angefügt (Cciir – Ccvv). Insgesamt lassen sich fünf solcher Exemplare mit Spiegels emendationes ausfindig machen, ihre Erstellung nach Erscheinen der Erstausgabe ist durch einen mitgedruckten Brief Spiegels an Vadian verbürgt.[29]

Darüber hinaus bot aber die schon in der ersten Auflage vorhandene Zweitwidmung Joachim Vadians (vormals selbst zum poeta laureatus gekrönt, Inhaber der Lektur für Poetik und Rhetorik in Wien[30]) für Matthäus Lang (Erzbischof von Gurk und engen Berater Maximilians[31]) Hinweise auf die intendierte Leserschaft (Austrias iiir-vir). Wie bereits bei Camers’ Widmungsschreiben gilt es auch bei Vadians zu bedenken, dass es sich dabei um die Einschätzungen eines Zeitgenossen und nicht die des Dichters selbst handelte. Da Bartolini anders als Cimbriacus die Veröffentlichung seines Werks allerdings persönlich anleitete und in seinen Schürer übermittelten Anweisungen die Zweitwidmung an Kardinal Lang sogar explizit einforderte[32], können diese Bedenken ad acta gelegt werden: Obgleich es sich bei Vadians Paratext nicht um Bartolinis eigene Worte handelt, entsprechen sie inhaltlich seiner Vorstellung und wurden von ihm autorisiert, die darin zu findende Konfiguration des intended readers darf demnach als relevant eingestuft werden. Diese Einschätzung wird ferner auch durch das Antwortschreiben Bartolinis an Pico della Mirandola (siehe weiter unten) gestützt.

Vadian schreibt in seiner Widmung an Lang, Bartolinis Werk sei zufällig in seine Hände gekommen, und sollte nun zum Ruhme des Autors und der Erinnerung an Maximilians glorreichen Sieg im Landshuter Erbfolgekrieg veröffentlicht werden. Ferner betont Vadian sowohl die Qualität des vorliegenden Textes als auch die Gelehrsamkeit des Verfassers, erklärt Bartolinis antikisierende Vorgangsweise im Umgang mit Eigennamen und versichert, dass der Poet bei ausreichender Ermunterung auch zukünftig bereitstehe, Lang, der als Figur des Epos auftritt, mit seinen Werken zu verherrlichen. Von Anfang an tritt die eruditio, die gelehrte Kenntnis, als zentrales Thema der Empfehlung hervor (iiir):

in manus meas (…) Riccardi Bartholini Perusini de bello Norico, plena eruditionis poemata venissent, essetque consilium non tamen meum atque eruditorum multorum ea in lucem (…) emittere, ut meritissima gloria non privaretur autor, et rerum nuper gestarum digna memoria series aeternitatem sortiretur.
Die mit gelehrter Kenntnis vollen Gedichte Riccardo Bartolinis über den Krieg in Noricum fielen mir in die Hände, und es war meine Absicht und die vieler anderer gebildeter Menschen, sie zu veröffentlichen, damit der Autor nicht um den sehr verdienten Ruhm gebracht und die Reihe der jüngsten Taten, die es wert sind, dass man sich an sie erinnert, für die Ewigkeit bewahrt wird. Übersetzung: Ebert  

Vadian präsentiert sich hier als Teil einer Bildungselite, die Bartolinis Werk kennt und es aufgrund dessen gelehrten Charakters schätzt. Offensichtlich verfügt diese Bildungselite aber nicht per se über die Möglichkeit, für den Erfolg des Werks garantieren zu können, denn binnen kürzester Zeit wird gleich zwei Mal Langs Auftreten als Mäzen hervorgehoben. So heißt es im Anschluss an das zuvor bereits zitierte Vorhaben der Herausgabe (iiir):

Visum est mihi tum demum hoc ipsum recte fieri, si tui in omnis eruditos patrocinii, tanti operis, vel prima pagina ratio haberetur.
Es schien mir, dass dies nur dann richtig erfolgen könne, wenn schon auf der ersten Seite eine Berücksichtigung deiner für alle gebildeten Menschen so wertvollen Patronage enthalten wäre. Übersetzung: Ebert  

Und wenig später (iiiv):

Uno omnium doctorum ore, uno optimorum quorumque qui te noverunt, consensu is esse iudicaris, in cuius conspectum debeant quotquot eduntur illustrium ingeniorum monumenta venire. Non tam ut illorum officio ille tibi honor (…) augeatur confirmetur quam ut scire possint dignum sit luce lectione, necne quod edunt.
Mit ein und derselben Stimme aller Gehehrten, mit einem einhelligen Urteil der Besten und derer, die dich kennen, wirst du als derjenige eingestuft, in dessen Blickfeld die Denkmäler, wie viele auch veröffentlicht werden, glänzender Geister kommen müssen. Nicht so sehr, damit durch die Pflicht ebenjener dein Ansehen gesteigert und bekräftigt wird, sondern mehr, damit sie wissen können, ob das, was sie herausgeben, einer öffentlichen Lektüre würdig ist. Übersetzung: Ebert  

Vadians Darstellung von Kardinal Lang als Literaturpatron und Connaisseur zeigt diesen als maßgeblichen Faktor für eine geglückte Rezeption des Werkes, sein Urteil entscheidet über die Publikation des vorgelegten Textes. Als intended reader begegnet damit einmal mehr nicht Maximilian, der Protagonist der zu verewigenden gestarum digna memoria series. Adressiert wird stattdessen erneut einer seiner humanistisch gebildeten Mitarbeiter. Dass mit der Lektüre des Werks durch Lang gerechnet wurde, indiziert die Länge von Vadians poetologischen Ausführungen: Diese gleichen einem vorweggenommenen Kommentar und nehmen mit vier von sechs Folien einen Großteil der Widmung ein. Sinnvoll scheint eine derartige Gewichtung nur dann, wenn mit einer kritischen Lektüre des Texts durch den Empfänger gerechnet wird, andernfalls könnten die detaillierten Erläuterungen ermüdend wirken und sogar Makel aufdecken, die einem unaufmerksamen Leser ohnehin verborgen geblieben wären. Erforderlich wäre die Lektüre Langs (die empirisch überdies kaum festgestellt werden kann) zur Förderung des Textes aber nicht zwingend: Er könnte seine Empfehlung ausschließlich auf den detaillierten Ausführungen Vadians beruhen lassen, denn auch als Nichtleser würde Lang über den nötigen politischen Einfluss verfügen, um eine positive Aufnahme von Werk und Verfasser beim Kaiser zu veranlassen. Relevant für den Erfolg des Werks sind nur sein Interesse daran und Kenntnis von dessen Existenz.

Dieselben Rückschlüsse auf eine potenzielle Leserschaft werden durch den im Werk abgedruckten Briefwechsel Bartolinis mit Gianfrancesco Pico della Mirandola nahegelegt (viv-viiir). Della Mirandola meint dort, Kaiser, Kardinal und sogar Italien und Germanien würden ob des verfassten Werks in Bartolinis Schuld stehen, ferner wird die dem Werk innewohnende eruditio gelobt. Dieser Verweis auf die eruditio offenbart in della Mirandola einen empirischen Leser, der an Bartolinis epischer Dichtung ebenjenes Element schätzt, das zuvor von Vadian so intensiv betont worden war, um den intendierten Leser Matthäus Lang für das Werk zu gewinnen. Diese partielle Übereinstimmung von intendiertem und empirischen Leser legt somit nahe, dass die zuvor eingeworfene, theoretisch bestehende Möglichkeit, der Verfasser könne mit der Konstruktion seiner intended reader völlig am empirischen Publikum vorbeigehen, für die Austrias ebenso unbegründet scheint wie zuvor bei den Encomiastica.

Haec ego, non tuae ut sententiae refragarer scripsi, sed ut alii, mea qualis esset de Diis opinio intelligerent.
Dies schrieb ich nicht, um deiner Meinung zu widersprechen, sondern damit Andere verstehen, welche Meinung ich von den Göttern habe. Übersetzung: Ebert

Gegen Ende seines Antwortschreibens erklärt Bartolini seine ausführliche Stellungnahme zu della Mirandolas Kritik am Einsatz des antiken Götterapparats damit, dass andere Leser dadurch die der Austrias zugrunde gelegten Gestaltungsprinzipien erkennen könnten. Bartolinis Replik verweist damit auf einen nicht näher identifizierbaren Kreis von Rezipienten (viiir):

Diese alii bleiben, betrachtet man diese Aussage isoliert, konturlos, sie gewinnen aber durch den Blick auf die von Bartolini ins Treffen geführten Argumente für den Einsatz des Götterapparats an Gestalt. Dort werden die paganen Gottheiten als Allegorie menschlicher Affekte verteidigt, zur Erklärung der intrinsischen Motivation der Dichter, mit ihren Werken Anklang zu finden, bedient sich Bartolini eines Horazzitats (Ars 333): prodesse volunt, et delectare Poetae viir („die Dichter wollen nützlich sein und erheitern.“). Außerdem wird dabei auf das Spiel mit der literarischen Fiktion bei Homer, Hesiod und Vergil hingewiesen, in deren Nachfolge sich Bartolini auf diese Weise implizit stellt. Es werden Beispiele für die allegorische Funktion des Götterapparats referenziert, ohne dabei konkrete Stellen zu nennen oder zu zitieren, ihre Kenntnis wird zum Verständnis der metapoetischen Überlegungen vorausgesetzt (viiv):

Hesiodi poemata exant, si ilhinc Deorum auferes nomina, totum tollas, mutilesque ornatum necesse est. Et tamen, ut illa ita de generatione mundi, rerumque ac Deorum senserit credere, quam philosophi esset, non plane intelligo.
Es gibt Gedichte Hesiods, bei denen es notwendig ist, wenn du aus ihnen die Namen der Götter entfernen wirst, die gesamte Zierde wegzunehmen und zu verstümmeln. Und dennoch erkenne ich dann nicht klar, was jener, wie es Aufgabe des Philosophen ist, über die Erschaffung der Welt, der Dinge und der Götter dachte. Übersetzung: Ebert  

Dass mit den Hesiodi poemata, in denen die Entstehung der Welt, der Sachen und der Götter thematisiert werden, die Theogonie gemeint ist, erfordert zunächst nur oberflächliches Wissen. Sich die referenzierten Szenen ohne Auftreten paganer Gottheiten vorzustellen, verlangt dagegen die präzise Kenntnis der Stellen und im Grunde auch die Fähigkeit zur griechischen Lektüre, die selbst bei Teilen der humanistischen Bildungselite nicht durchwegs vorausgesetzt werden konnte. Fassen wir also zusammen: Jene zuvor erwähnten alii sollten durch Bartolinis literarische Ausführungen im Brief an della Mirandola zur korrekten Interpretation seines Textes befähigt werden. Zum Verständnis dieser Ausführungen ist wiederum eine Sinnkonstruktion der Lesenden erforderlich. Konsequenterweise muss also davon ausgegangen werden, dass diese zum Verständnis der Erklärungen erforderliche Sinnkonstruktion den angeführten alii zugetraut wurde – andernfalls wären Bartolinis Ausführungen ins Leere gelaufen. Erneut ist es daher naheliegend, dass die als alii bezeichneten intended readers, auch ohne namentlich genannt zu werden, über einen humanistischen Bildungshorizont verfügten. Bestärkt wird diese Interpretation auch durch die den Brief einleitenden Grußworte Bartolinis an della Mirandola, mit denen er bekennt, hinsichtlich einer möglichen Veröffentlichung nach der Begutachtung durch della Mirandola zuversichtlicher geworden zu sein (viir). Diese gewachsene Zuversicht gründet dabei auf dem hohen Ansehen della Mirandolas im Kreis der Gebildeten (cum tanti sis apud eruditos et nominis et autoritatis). Wenn in della Mirandola also eine Testperson für den möglichen Erfolg des Werks gefunden wird und dieser Testperson zugleich als Führungsfigur der eruditi, das heißt der Bildungselite, inszeniert wird, so ist es nur logisch, den intendierten (und hier zugleich empirischen) Leser della Mirandola als Pars pro Toto einer humanistisch gebildeten, intendierten Leserschaft zu betrachten. Diesen Eindruck festigt auch die dem Werk nachgestellte Autoris ad posteritatem protestatio, in der Bartolini seine möglichen Leser bittet, diese mögen nachsichtig mit ihm umgehen (Bbiiiv):

Da veniam, canimus nullis tentata Camoenis Arma prius, Cyrrhaeque ferens de vertice Musas Primus ego ingredior Germana per oppida Vates.
Gewähre Nachsicht, ich besang Waffenfänge, die von keinen Musen zuvor aufgegriffen worden waren, indem ich die Musen vom Gipfel Kirrhas herbringen, schreite ich als Erster Sänger durch die germanischen Städte. Übersetzung: Ebert  

Die Bitte um wohlwollende Aufnahme des Werks ist ein literarischer Topos, Relevanz besitzt die dafür gebotene Begründung. Bartolini erhofft sich die Nachsicht des potenziellen Lesers aufgrund der Neuartigkeit seines Stoffs. Er habe bisher von den Sängern unangetastete Waffengänge vorgetragen und die Musen nach Germanien geholt. Indem Bartolini seine Vorreiterrolle bei der Episierung zeitgenössischer Kriegshandlungen betont, argumentiert er auf einer literaturtheoretischen Ebene. Diese Strategie ist nur dann schlüssig, wenn von einem Publikum ausgegangen wird, das die traditionelle Darstellung von Schlachten kennt, ihr Fehlen in der kontemporären Epik bemerkt und über die zum Vergleich befähigende intertextuelle Lesekompetenz verfügt. In den weiteren Begleitgedichten werden Bartolinis literarische Fähigkeiten gelobt, auch Paolo Amalteo inszeniert dabei Maximilian als möglichen Patron des Schriftstellers, nicht aber zwingend als Leser (Bbvv):

Cui si quae praestas servaveris ocia Caesar, Redduntur dices tempora Vergilij
Falls du ihm (dem Dichter) die Muße, die du gewährst, erhalten solltest, Kaiser, wirst du sagen „Die Zeiten Vergils werden nachgeahmt.“ Übersetzung: Ebert  

Empirical readers

Maximilian selbst darf zweifellos Interesse an einer lateinischen Gedechtnus attestiert werden, maßgeblich vorangetrieben wurden sie aber von ihn umgebenden Humanisten wie Cuspinian oder Celtis[33]. Für die lateinischen Reden des Wiener Fürstentags konnte Müller[34] anhand Ricardo Bartolinis Odeporicon[35] nachweisen, dass sich an ihnen in erster Linie nicht die in diesen Reden verherrlichten Machthaber, sondern ihre humanistisch gebildeten Berater erfreuten. Sie waren es, die als Patrone literarischer Produktion in Erscheinung und an die sich Literaturschaffende mit der Bitte um Förderung oder Weitervermittlung an einen Fürsten wandten.[36] Der Umstand, dass sie in den Paratexten als potenzielle Leser angesprochen werden, und nicht der im Epos verherrlichte Kaiser, überrascht daher nur bedingt. Auch die Selbstinszenierung Camers’ als Wiederentdecker eines vergessenen Herrscherlob und die prominente Erwähnung seiner Beteiligung bei der Publikation des enkomiastischen Textes, zeigen, dass zwischen Verfasser und Herrscher humanistische gebildete Kanzleimitarbeiter als vermittelnde Instanz zwischengeschalten waren, die sich dieser Rolle durchaus bewusst waren. Dem Kaiser selbst war die Existenz des ihn rühmenden Textes unbekannt, er war darauf angewiesen, darüber in Kenntnis gesetzt zu werden. Obwohl sich aufgrund der notwendigen Bildung zum Dekodieren der Antikebezüge (das heißt der Konfiguration des implied readers) der Kreis potenzieller Leser eingrenzen lässt und die Namensnennungen in den Paratexten auf intended readers verweisen, bleibt der konkrete Nachweis von Lektüre schwierig: Die empirisch nachweisbare Rezeption der Texte ist im Grunde nur durch Lesespuren gesichert möglich. Und auch dann, wenn sich die Lektüre in Form von Annotationen, Marginalien, Exzerpte materialisiert hat, gelingt die Identifikation des Lesers nicht immer (ein Beispiel dafür findet sich unter Reading Maximilian, der vom Teilprojekt (Con)Textualising Maximilian veröffentlichten Blogreihe[37]).

Die Encomiastica erweisen sich diesbezüglich als Glücksfall, da – abgesehen vom Editor Camers – ein Leser nachgewiesen werden kann, für den darüber hinaus das Lektüreinteresse/der Fokus seiner Lektüre erkennbar ist: Adrian Wolfhard (1491-1545) lehnt sich in seiner Panegyris (Wien 1512), einem (zumindest teilweise biographisch strukturierten) Panegyricus auf Maximilian engstens an zwei Passagen der Encomiastica (d.h. der gedruckten Fassung) an: der Königswahl Maximilians und der Tapisseriebeschreibung. Dazu, dass Wolfhard Maximilian rühmt, die Musen aus Italien geholt zu haben, passt die Rezeption eines italienischen Humanisten; zudem lassen Beziehungen zum Editor Camers nachweisen, der die Rezeption des von ihm herausgegebenen Epos als Kompliment auffassen konnte. Das Geleitgedicht des Joachim Vadian nennt als Zielgruppe die Bildungselite in Wien, zu der auch der Widmungsträger, der Wiener Bürgermeister Martin Siebenbürger (der vielleicht auch als Siebenbürger Landsmann angesprochen wurde), zählte. Auch die Rezeption der Panegyris selbst erfolgte im universitären Milieu; zwei mit Worterklärungen annotierte Exemplare des Drucks (Wien, ÖNB 21.573-B; München, BSB Res 4 Epist 9#Beibd. 4) deuten auf eine Verwendung im Unterricht hin. Das Lobgedicht auf Maximilian wurde also fernab vom Hof geschrieben und gelesen, Maximilian dient (auch wenn direkt angesprochen) nur als Objekt, an dem humanistische Bildung demonstriert und geübt werden kann. Ähnlich präsentiert sich die Möglichkeit eines Rezeptionsnachweises in Bezug auf die Austrias. Eine Lektüre des Texts darf bei jenen Humanisten, die Begleitgedichte dazu verfassten, vorausgesetzt, bei della Mirandola und Spiegel als belegt erachtet werden. Spiegel verfasste ferner neben seinen bereits erwähnten emendationes auch einen 1531 erschienen Scholienkommentar. Darüber hinaus erschienen 1540 Joachim Frundecks Austrias, die nicht nur den gleichen Namen wie Bartolinis Epos trägt, sondern auch einen dort begegnenden Flusskatalog übernahm.

Fazit: Rezeption ohne Lektüre?

Vergegenwärtigen wir uns also die angetroffenen Lesertypen: Textintern trafen wir auf einen implied reader, der die Charakteristika der humanistischen Bildungselite um Maximilian teilte. Dabei bleibt fraglich, ob der empirisch greifbare Politiker Maximilian über die nötige Lektürekompetenz verfügte, auszugehen ist davon, wie die bereits zitierte Rezeption der Reden am Fürstentag 1515 zeigten, jedenfalls nicht. Die Paratexte zu den Encomiastica und der Austrias präsentierten uns als intended reader Humanisten, die teilweise über Zugang zum Feld der Macht verfügten, jedenfalls aber über den Bildungshorizont des implied readers. Wenn enkomiastische Epik im Umfeld Kaiser Maximilians I. also als Dichtung von Humanisten für Humanisten bezeichnet werden muss: Wo bleibt Maximilian, der lebende, reale Herrscher? – der weder dem implied reader entspricht noch als künftiger Leser angesprochen bzw. überhaupt in Erwägung gezogen wird,[38] von dem aber doch Anerkennung erhofft wurde. Nachvollziehbar wird die Rolle des Kaisers im Rezeptionsnetzwerk durch einen Blick auf die Praxis der Dichterkrönungen. Schirrmeister legte in seinen Untersuchungen dazu die persönlichen Verflechtungen, die zum Erreichen der Dichterkrone benötigt wurden, offen.[39] Nicht allein die literarische Qualität des verfassten Textes, sondern die Beziehungen des Dichters zu jenem den Kaiser beratenden Personenkreis erwiesen sich dabei als maßgeblicher Faktor. Wenn also der Dichter zur Verwirklichung seiner Karriereziele darauf angewiesen war, im Feld der Macht einen Zirkel an Unterstützern aufzubauen, so ist es nur logisch, dass auch der verfasste Text erst diese Vermittler passieren musste, ehe er öffentliche Anerkennung genießen konnte. Maximilian, der sich grundsätzlich an memoria auch in lateinischer Sprache interessiert zeigte, blieb somit in der Rolle eines Nichtlesers. Der Kaiser ist auf die Vermittlung von Wissen um die Existenz eines Epos, die durch potenzielle Leser mit Zugang zum Herrscher erfolgte, ohne dass deren Lektüre empirisch nachgewiesen werden könnte, angewiesen. Die Empfehlung dieser Vermittler beruhte ihrerseits wiederum ebenso auf Empfehlungen von potenziellen Lesern mit den Kompetenzen des implied reader sowie guter literarischer Reputation (vgl. die Trias um Bartolini, Vadian und Lang im Fall der Austrias). Abschließend kann daher festgehalten werden: Das Rezeptionsnetzwerk enkomiastischer Dichtung auf Maximilian umfasste nicht nur die ohnehin selten nachweisbaren empirischen Leser, sondern ebenso die Nichtleser. Erst ihre Interaktion mit Lesenden ermöglichte die erfolgreiche Aufnahme eines Textes im Umfeld des Kaisers.

Zitierte Textausgaben:

Riccardo Bartolini, Ad divum Maximi=|lianum Caesarem Augustum, | Riccardi Bartholini, de bel|lo Norico Austriados | Libri duodecim. Straßburg: Matthias Schürer, 1516. (VD 16 B 562; 38.E.17)

Aelius Quintius Aemilianus Cimbriacus, Encomiastica Ad Divos Caess. Foedericum Imperatorem Et Maximilanum Regem Ro., Argentorati: M. Schürer 1512.

Vergilius Maro, Publius, Niklas Holzberg, and Markus Schauer. Aeneis : Lateinisch-Deutsch. Berlin Boston: De Gruyter, 2015.

Codex Fuchsmagen: Gedichte | Codex Fuchsmagen (uibk.ac.at)

Zitierte Sekundärliteratur:

Abbondanza, Roberto, ‘Marianus Bartolini’, ed. by Mario Caravale, Dizionario Biografico Degli Italiani (Ist. della Enciclopedia Italiana, 1964)

Bettenworth, Anja, ‘Banquet Scenes in Ancient Epic’, in Structures of Epic Poetry, ed. by Christiane Reitz and Simone Finkmann (De Gruyter, 2019), 2.2, 55–88

Bitto, Gregor, and Maria Gauly Bardo, eds., Auf Der Suche Nach Autofiktion in Der Antiken Literatur, Philologus. Zeitschrift Für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption, 16 (De Gruyter)

Block, Elizabeth, ‘The Narrator Speaks: Apostrophe in Homer and Vergil’, Transactions of the American Philological Association, 112, 1982, pp. 7–22

D’Alessandro Behr, Francesca, ‘The Narrator’s Voice: A Narratogical Reappraisal of Apostrophe in Virgil’s Aeneid’, Arethusa, 38 (2) (2005), pp. 189–221

Dienbauer, Lorenz, Arbeitskreis f. Kirchl. Zeit- u. Wiener Diözesangeschichte : Johannes Camers, Der Theologe Und Humanist Im Ordenskleid ; Beiträge Zur Erforschung d. Gegenreformation u. Des Humanismus in Wien, Miscellanea / Wiener Katholische Akademie, Arbeitskreis Für Kirchliche Zeit- Und Wiener Diözesangeschichte, 7 (1976)

Füssel, Stephan, Riccardus Bartholinus Perusinus. Humanistische Panegyrik am Hofe Kaiser Maximilians I., Saecula spiritalia (1987), xvi

Gärtner, Ursula, and Karen Blaschka, ‘Similes and Comparisons in the Epic Tradition’, in Structures of Epic Poetry, ed. by Christiane Reitz and Simone Finkmann (De Gruyter, 2019), i, 727–72

Grössing, Helmuth. “Perger, Bernhard” In Verfasser-Datenbank. Berlin, New York: De Gruyter, 2012. https://www-degruyter-com.uaccess.univie.ac.at/database/VDBO/entry/vdbo.killy.4940/html

Gwynne, Paul, ‘Epic’, in A Guide to Neo-Latin Literature, ed. by Victoria Moul (Cambridge University Press, 2017), pp. 200–220

Harrison, Stephen, ‘Artefact Ekphrasis and Narrative in Epic Poetry from Homer to Silius’, in Structures o Epic Poetry, ed. by Christiane Reitz and Simone Finkmann (De Gruyter, 2019), i, 773–806

Hofmann, Heinz, ‘Von Africa Über Bethlehem Nach Amerika. Das Epos in Der Neulateinischen Literatur.’, in Von Göttern Und Menschen Erzählen. Formkonstanzen Und Funktionswandel Vormoderner Epik, ed. by Jörg Rüpke, Potsdamer Altertumswissenschaftliche Beiträge, 4 (Steiner, 2001), pp. 130–82

Klecker, Elisabeth, ‘Lateinische Epik für Maximilian’, in Kaiser Maximilian I. Ein großer Habsburger., ed. by Katharina Kaska (Residenz Verlag, 2019), pp. 84–93

———, ‘Tapisserien Kaiser Maximilians. Zu Ekphrasen in Der Neulateinischen Habsburg-Panegyrik’, in Die Poetische Ekphrasis von Kunstwerken. Eine Literarische Tradition Der Großdichtung in Antike, Mittelalter Und Früher Neuzeit, ed. by Christine Ratkowitsch, Phil.-Hist. Klasse, Sitzungsberichte, 735 (2006), pp. 181–202

Moschella, Maurizio, ‘Giovanni Stefano Emiliano’, ed. by Mario Caravale, Dizionario Biografico Degli Italiani (Ist. della Enciclopedia Italiana, 1993), 613–15

Müller, Jan-Dirk, Gedechtnus. Literatur Und Hofgesellschaft Um Maximilian I., Forschungen Zur Geschichte Der Älteren Deutschen Literatur, 2 (1982)

———, ‘Imperiale Hofkultur im Blick der Gelehrten. Riccardo Bartolinis Hodoeporicon vom Wiener Fürstentag (1515)’, in Maximilians Welt. Kaiser Maximilian I. im Spannungsfeld zwischen Innovation und Tradition., Berliner Mittelalter- und Frühneuzeitforschung (2018), xxii, 19–40

Pillinini, Giovanni, ‘Antonio Boldù’, ed. by Mario Caravale, Dizionario Biografico Degli Italiani (Ist. della Enciclopedia Italiana, 1969)

Schaffenrath, Florian, ‘Das erste Großepos über Kaiser Maximilian I. Ein Vergleich der beiden Fassungen der „Encomiastica“ des Helius Quinctius Cimbriacus’, Bibliothèque d’Humanisme et Renaissance, 81 (2019), pp. 103–40

Schirrmeister, Albert, Triumph des Dichters. Gekrönte Intellektuelle im 16. Jahrhundert., Frühneuzeitstudien, Neue Folge (Böhlau Verlag, 2003), iv

Schirrmeister, Albert. “Vadian, Joachim” In Verfasser-Datenbank. Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2013. https://www-degruyter-com.uaccess.univie.ac.at/database/VDBO/entry/vdbo.vlhum.0207/html

Schmid, Wolf, ‘Implied Reader’, in Handbook of Narratology. 2nd Edition, Fully Revised and Expanded, ed. by Peter Hühn, Jan Christoph Meister, John Pier, and Wolf Schmid (De Gruyter, 2014), i, 301–8

Stok, Fabio, ‘Virgil in the Renaissance Court’, in Virgil and Renaissance Culture, ed. by Marco Sgarbi and L. B. T. Houghton, Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 510 (Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2018), pp. 31–47

Wagner-Engelhaaf, Martina, ‘Was Ist Auto(r)Fiktion?’, in Auto(r)Fiktion: Literarische Verfahren Der Selbstkonstruktion, ed. by Wagner-Engelhaaf (Aisthesis-Verl., 2013), pp. 7–22

Walter, Anke, ‘Erzählen und Gesang im flavischen Epos’, in Erzählen und Gesang im flavischen Epos (De Gruyter, 2014), doi:10.1515/9783110336580

Worstbrock, Franz Josef. “Bartholinus, Riccardus” In Verfasser-Datenbank. Berlin, New York: De Gruyter, 2012. https://www-degruyter-com.uaccess.univie.ac.at/database/VDBO/entry/vdbo.vlhum.0012/html


[1] Die Frage, inwiefern die Verfasser lateinischer Epik auch Frauen als Leserinnen vor Augen hatten, stellt ein Forschungsdesiderat dar. Basierend auf den namentlich genannten intendierten Lesern und der empirisch nachgewiesenen Leserschaft, die ausschließlich aus Männern bestand, wird die Frage nach einer potenziellen „idealen Rezipientin“ hier im Folgenden übergangen.

[2] Wolf Schmid, ‘Implied Reader’, in Handbook of Narratology. 2nd Edition, Fully Revised and Expanded, ed. by Peter Hühn and others (De Gruyter, 2014), i, 301–8.

[3] Martina Wagner-Engelhaaf, ‘Was Ist Auto(r)Fiktion?’, in Auto(r)Fiktion: Literarische Verfahren Der Selbstkonstruktion, ed. by Wagner-Engelhaaf (Aisthesis-Verl., 2013), pp. 7–22; Auf Der Suche Nach Autofiktion in Der Antiken Literatur, ed. by Gregor Bitto and Maria Gauly Bardo, Philologus. Zeitschrift Für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption, 16 (De Gruyter).

[4] Es würde den gegebenen Rahmen sprengen, hier ins Detail zu gehen, angemerkt sei aber, dass sowohl textinterne Referenzen als auch textexterne Belege dafürsprechen, den Erzähler als Autofiktion des Verfassers zu interpretieren.

[5] Elizabeth Block, ‘The Narrator Speaks: Apostrophe in Homer and Vergil’, Transactions of the American Philological Association, 112, 1982, pp. 7–22; Francesca D’Alessandro Behr, ‘The Narrator’s Voice: A Narratogical Reappraisal of Apostrophe in Virgil’s Aeneid’, Arethusa, 38 (2) (2005), pp. 189–221.

[6] Block, pp. 9–10.

[7] Albert Schirrmeister, Triumph des Dichters. Gekrönte Intellektuelle im 16. Jahrhundert., Frühneuzeitstudien, Neue Folge (Böhlau Verlag, 2003), iv.

[8] Auch bekannt als Giovanni Stefano Emiliano, zu seiner Biographie siehe: Maurizio Moschella, ‘Giovanni Stefano Emiliano’, ed. by Mario Caravale, Dizionario Biografico Degli Italiani (Ist. della Enciclopedia Italiana, 1993), 613–15. Online abgerufen unter: https://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/emiliano-giovanni-stefano-detto-il-cimbriaco_(Dizionario-Biografico)/ (29. März 2024)

[9] Elisabeth Klecker, ‘Lateinische Epik für Maximilian’, in Kaiser Maximilian I. Ein großer Habsburger., ed. by Katharina Kaska (Residenz Verlag, 2019), pp. 84–93 (pp. 85–87).

[10] Florian Schaffenrath, ‘Das erste Großepos über Kaiser Maximilian I. Ein Vergleich der beiden Fassungen der „Encomiastica“ des Helius Quinctius Cimbriacus’, Bibliothèque d’Humanisme et Renaissance, 81 (2019), pp. 103–40 (p. 106).

[11] Worstbrock, Franz Josef. “Bartholinus, Riccardus” In Verfasser-Datenbank. Berlin, New York: De Gruyter, 2012. https://www-degruyter-com.uaccess.univie.ac.at/database/VDBO/entry/vdbo.vlhum.0012/html

[12] Stephan Füssel, Riccardus Bartholinus Perusinus. Humanistische Panegyrik am Hofe Kaiser Maximilians I., Saecula spiritalia (1987), xvi, p. 144.

[13] Schirrmeister, iv, pp. 221–28.

[14] Panegyrik, die nicht gefällt, verfehlt ihren Zweck. Die Möglichkeit, dass die vorliegenden Texte nicht Beifall, sondern etwa Kontroversen hervorrufen sollten, kann aufgrund des panegyrischen Charakters der Texte (ersichtlich in textinternen Belegen, aber auch in Paratexten und validierbar durch ihren Entstehungskontext) beiseitegelegt werden. Das Hoffen auf positive Aufnahme muss daher für die Abfassung der Encomiastica und der Austrias vorausgesetzt werden.

[15] Heinz Hofmann, ‘Von Africa Über Bethlehem Nach Amerika. Das Epos in Der Neulateinischen Literatur.’, in Von Göttern Und Menschen Erzählen. Formkonstanzen Und Funktionswandel Vormoderner Epik, ed. by Jörg Rüpke, Potsdamer Altertumswissenschaftliche Beiträge, 4 (Steiner, 2001), pp. 130–82; Paul Gwynne, ‘Epic’, in A Guide to Neo-Latin Literature, ed. by Victoria Moul (Cambridge University Press, 2017), pp. 200–220.

[16] Fabio Stok, ‘Virgil in the Renaissance Court’, in Virgil and Renaissance Culture, ed. by Marco Sgarbi and L. B. T. Houghton, Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 510 (Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2018), pp. 31–47.

[17] Ursula Gärtner and Karen Blaschka, ‘Similes and Comparisons in the Epic Tradition’, in Structures of Epic Poetry, ed. by Christiane Reitz and Simone Finkmann (De Gruyter, 2019), i, 727–72 (p. 727).

[18] Stephen Harrison, ‘Artefact Ekphrasis and Narrative in Epic Poetry from Homer to Silius’, in Structures o Epic Poetry, ed. by Christiane Reitz and Simone Finkmann (De Gruyter, 2019), i, 773–806 (p. 773).

[19] Elisabeth Klecker, ‘Tapisserien Kaiser Maximilians. Zu Ekphrasen in Der Neulateinischen Habsburg-Panegyrik’, in Die Poetische Ekphrasis von Kunstwerken. Eine Literarische Tradition Der Großdichtung in Antike, Mittelalter Und Früher Neuzeit, ed. by Christine Ratkowitsch, Phil.-Hist. Klasse, Sitzungsberichte, 735 (2006), pp. 181–202 (pp. 183–86).

[20] Giovanni Pillinini, ‘Antonio Boldù’, ed. by Mario Caravale, Dizionario Biografico Degli Italiani (Ist. della Enciclopedia Italiana, 1969). Online abgerufen unter: https://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/antonio-boldu_(Dizionario-Biografico)/ (29. März 2024)

[21] Anja Bettenworth, ‘Banquet Scenes in Ancient Epic’, in Structures of Epic Poetry, ed. by Christiane Reitz and Simone Finkmann (De Gruyter, 2019), 2.2, 55–88.

[22] Anke Walter, ‘Erzählen und Gesang im flavischen Epos’, in Erzählen und Gesang im flavischen Epos (De Gruyter, 2014), pp. 6–8, doi:10.1515/9783110336580.

[23] Füssel, xvi, p. 174.

[24] Roberto Abbondanza, ‘Marianus Bartolini’, ed. by Mario Caravale, Dizionario Biografico Degli Italiani (Ist. della Enciclopedia Italiana, 1964). Online abgerufen unter: https://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/mariano-bartolini_(Dizionario-Biografico)/ (30. März 2024)

[25] Lorenz Dienbauer, Arbeitskreis f. Kirchl. Zeit- u. Wiener Diözesangeschichte : Johannes Camers, Der Theologe Und Humanist Im Ordenskleid ; Beiträge Zur Erforschung d. Gegenreformation u. Des Humanismus in Wien, Miscellanea / Wiener Katholische Akademie, Arbeitskreis Für Kirchliche Zeit- Und Wiener Diözesangeschichte, 7 (1976).

[26] Diese wurde im Zuge der Aufbereitung des Codex Fuchsmagen von Forschenden der Universität Innsbruck übersetzt und kommentiert wurde: https://fuchsmagen.wisski.uibk.ac.at/wisski/navigate/94125/view

[27] Verändert wurde unter anderem die im finalen Vers attackierte Person: Während in der Erstfassung ein nicht näher identifizierter Urius nach dem Erfolg der Encomiastica nicht mehr die Nase rümpfen kann und Grimassenschneider sowie Lehrlinge der Fischverkäufer ausgelacht werden können, fehlt Urius in der Zweitfassung und das reüssierende Werk spottet über die Albernheiten einer Suilla. Ob damit auf eine konkrete Person abgezielt wird, oder unter Suilla mit „Schweinefleisch“ eine kulturelle Praktik (Verkäufer von Schweinefleisch?) zu verstehen ist, erschließt sich mir zum gegenwärtigen Zeitpunkt nicht.

[28] Grössing, Helmuth. “Perger, Bernhard” In Verfasser-Datenbank. Berlin, New York: De Gruyter, 2012. https://www-degruyter-com.uaccess.univie.ac.at/database/VDBO/entry/vdbo.killy.4940/html

[29] Füssel, xvi, p. 194.

[30] Schirrmeister, Albert. “Vadian, Joachim” In Verfasser-Datenbank. Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 2013. https://www-degruyter-com.uaccess.univie.ac.at/database/VDBO/entry/vdbo.vlhum.0207/html

[31] Jan-Dirk Müller, Gedechtnus. Literatur Und Hofgesellschaft Um Maximilian I., Forschungen Zur Geschichte Der Älteren Deutschen Literatur, 2 (1982), pp. 35–37.

[32] Füssel, xvi, p. 150.

[33] Müller, pp. 74–79.

[34] Jan-Dirk Müller, ‘Imperiale Hofkultur im Blick der Gelehrten. Riccardo Bartolinis Hodoeporicon vom Wiener Fürstentag (1515)’, in Maximilians Welt. Kaiser Maximilian I. im Spannungsfeld zwischen Innovation und Tradition., Berliner Mittelalter- und Frühneuzeitforschung (2018), xxii, 19–40.

[35] Dabei handelt es sich um einen Reisebericht in Form eines Tagebuchs, dessen Inhalt die Anreise Kardinal Langs, in dessen Gefolge sich Bartolini befand, von Augsburg zum Fürstentag in Wien 1515.

[36] Schirrmeister, iv, pp. 38–47.

[37] Reading Maximilian – (Con)Textualising Maximilian. (univie.ac.at)

[38] Am nächsten kommt Nagonius im Widmungsbrief an Maximilian: ut cum ocium nactus fueris nostro hoc labore frequentius fruaris („dass Du, wenn Du Muße findest, diese meine Arbeit häufiger genießen kannst“). Er zeigt aber wohl gerade dadurch, wie fern er dem Kreis um Maximilian tatsächlich steht, da er keinen Vermittler aus dem Kreis der humanistisch gebildeten Räte Maximilians ansprechen kann.

[39] Schirrmeister, iv, pp. 195–212.

Workshop: Antike Spiele – Antike Spielen

Unter dem Titel „Antike Spiele – Antike spielen“ organisierte das Team des Teilprojekt (Con)Textualising Maximilian am 3. Juni in Kooperation mit Katharina Kaska (Österreichische Nationalbibliothek) einen Workshop in der Handschriftensammlung der ÖNB. Vorgestellt wurden Beiträge zu den Leichenspielen der antiken Epik und ihre Rezeption in der enkomiastischen Dichtung auf Maximilian, ebenso wie die Rolle von Spielen in Turnierbüchern, Predigten und Inkunabeldrucken. Platz wurde aber auch der diachronen Betrachtung von Spielen und dem Fortleben antiker Praktiken gewidmet.

With the slogan “Antike Spiele – Antike spielen”, the team of the sub-project (Con)Textualising Maximilian organized a workshop in the manuscript collection of the ÖNB on 3 June in cooperation with Katharina Kaska (Austrian National Library). Contributions were presented on the funeral games of ancient epic poetry and their reception in the encomiastic poetry on Maximilian, as well as the role of games in tournament books, sermons and incunabula prints. However, space was also devoted to the diachronic consideration of games and the survival of ancient practices.

Bemerkungen zu den Gattungen der lateinischen Drucke für Ks. Maximilian I.

Remarks on the genres of the Latin prints for Emperor Maximilian I.

Lukas Ebert

See english version below

In den Katalogen der VD16 (https://www.gateway-bayern.de/TP61/start.do ) und der Österreichischen Nationalbank begegnen 39 Drucke, in denen Maximilian schon im Titel erwähnt wird (exklusive späterer Nachdrucke selber Werke).

Neben drei Epen, zwei Prognostika und den Amores des Conrad Celtis führen 20 Drucke einzelner Reden, Gedichte und Aufführungen, sowie 13 Anthologien diverser Reden und Gedichte vor/an Maximilian den Kaiser im Titel. Unter jenen Drucken, die als selbständige Publikationen erschienen, finden sich neun Reden vor/an Maximilian, vier Gedichte, je zwei theologische Traktate, Theateraufführungen und Aufforderungen zum Krieg gegen die Türken bzw. Venedig, sowie Bartholinus’ Reisebericht zum Wiener Fürstentag 1515. Bei den Anthologien wird der Konnex zu Maximilian sechs Mal via ihm gewidmeten Gedichten, fünf Mal in an den Kaiser adressierten Reden, sowie durch je eine dem Herrscher dedizierte Rechts- und Briefsammlung hergestellt.

Continue reading…